Additional Information on
Nikon PC-Micro Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 D Special Perspective Control Close up application telephoto lens

 
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June, 1999, a time where everyone began to heat up with huge potential digital imaging may offer to the photo community, Nikon unleashed a new innovative lense type - a hybrid between Perspective Control (PC) and Micro-Nikkor. Very few people took notice of this launch as this is quite a specialized kind of a new breed and product information was quite scarce other than those conventional press releases via respective Nikon official sites and some localized promotions what can this new lense can offer photographers in exploring new grounds in photography.

Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 Side detail view Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 front lens element view
A mini photo gallery of Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f2.8D telephoto lens

Credit
: Image courtesy of Jeff@photocreative ® where Jeff's Company PHOTO CREATIVE INC> has a very popular EBAY STORE on its own. Tel: (905) 629-0100 Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.
Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 the front filter ring and optical lens Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 rear section lens mount view

"... This Nikon PC 85mm f2.8 D lens is optically and cosmetically. Virtually like new! Optics front rear and internal are perfect! This lens has the Nikon PC system, (perspective control with reproduction directly to 1:2 ) where it can make adjustments (tilt / shift) to influence depth of field and selective focus precisely -- great for table top product shooting, and nature etc. This lens is a fantastic, unique lens. It has the smallest aperture of any current Nikkor at f45!! Talk about depth of field!!! It is compatible and sharp on both your Nikon AF film SLR as well as the latest Nikon DSLRs, so your investment is safe either way! It comes with both front and rear dust caps, hard case and its Instruction manual ... " - Jeff from Photo Creative@EBAY-
Hasselblad flexBody.jpg
<<<--- Copyright-free images collection © 2004 .
From its exterior, it has a strong resemblance of the Hasselblad's short-lived Flex-Body / Arc-series cameras (1996/7). This unique Nikkor lense combines three major designing concept: - A Medium Telephoto with TILT/Shift Control and a Revolving capability. It permits shifting the lense parallel to the film plane as well as tilting the lens axis (shift: ±12,4 mm, tilt: ±8.3mm') in elimination perspective distortion and extension of focus for depth of field control. It is something that is exclusively found only on large format cameras with adjustable front lense plates. But the PC-Micro can actually performs TILT / SHIFT as well as REVOLVING (±90°).
Due to its extremely complex optical movement, and thus it is not designed as an AF-Nikkor lens-type but it does has a CPU embodied within and you can use the lense as a normal lense for metering prior to use some automatic exposure control. However, once the lense is being shift or tilt, data communication will be disengaged and thus, you ought to perform metering prior to adjust for shift or tilt control. The cameras exposure metering and flash control system do not work properly when shifting and/or tilting the lense, or when using an aperture other than the maximum aperture. Shifting and/or tilting the lens to a large degree can cause some vignetting.

PC PNB - IC circuitry demo picture
A telephoto native of PC Micro is less distorted from a distance, where you can set up with other artificuial light source with its extended working distance.

Interim photo ONLY. Looking for contributing images to substitute this.

Nikon PC-Micro Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 D lens data and focusing / perspective control index
Note: This lens cannot be used with the Nikon PRONEAS series cameras. For older Nikon SLRs, you can use the conventional method to adjust apertures, but for the newer Nikon SLRs that employ with command dial(s), you have to adjust apertures via the preset aperture ring. For camera such as Nikon F5, F100 (or later models such as the Nikon F6 etc.), since autofocusing is not available, you can still use the electronic rangefinder to help determine left/right directions for precise focusing.

Credit: Image courtesy of Jeff@photocreative@ EBAY STORE ®Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

Nikon PC-Micro Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 D vertical view
So, it performs and sound like more like an improved PC-Nikkor but why calling it a Micro lense then ? Simple, unlike the PC-Nikkor, this PC-Micro can focus all the way from infinity to an impressive reproduction ratio of half-life-size (1:2) at its closest focusing distance of 039m. Further, with its angle of view at 28' 30' , close-up pictures yields a more natural perspective than lense of shorter focal length. Yes. As long as you can live with some slight inconveniences (such as difficult o setup, lack of AF, stop down AE when shift/tilt ), overall, this lense is quite a versatile lense. It allows you to control certain levels in perspective in a picture, also brought a new dimension in microphotography as depth of field can be manipulated by extending or limiting slightly in particular for studio product shooting. So, a wide scope of photographic applications such as architecture, photomicrography, forensic, landscape, flora, scenic, flat field copying or even for portraiture as well as anything to do with a typical medium telephoto lense can offer. Sounds great huh ?

Weighing at 775g, the all-metal structure of this lense projects a very robust, high quality feel. It uses a rather complex optical arrangement of a massive 12 elements in 9 groups, the lense has a filter attachment size at n odd 77mm diameter. You may find it hard to get some original Nikon accessories such as filter for this lense. Even if it has, they are quite expensive. One of the key highlight is its extreme aperture of f/45 - the smallest working f-stop you can find in the entire Nikkor lense family where it is designed for truly full-extended depth of field control. The main issue is the operation of this lense as it has quite a few combinations in shift, tilt and revolving mechanism and may take a seasoned PC-Nikkor owner to handle it more easily in the setup process during shooting.

PC-Micro-images/85mmshift.JPG
As the lense comes with a retail price at approx. USD1,200-00 (B&H Photo's suggested prices after rebate 03.2005), it is not entirely a cheap Nikkor, but it has extended a new ground of possibilities for Nikon photographers to explore in this segment where previously, one has to settled for the static use of all the available perspective control lenses in the Nikkor lense group.

Credit: Image courtesy of Mr. Moses Goddard® <Mbigoddard@aol.com>. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Important Notes: When using a camera body with an interchangeable focusing screen feature, Nikon recommends that the use an optional E-type focusing screen with grids type. (E-type focusing screen cannot be used with the Nikon Professional Digital SLR D1-series models.) This lense cannot be attached to the Nikon F5 with DA-30 AE Action Finder attached, F2 Photomic, or Nikon F3AF camera body since they interfere with the lense. This lense cannot be used with the AF PRONEA S, MF Nikon EM camera since both models do not have M (manual) exposure mode.

Below are some of the basic operational sequence in setting up the lense for each of its major functions:
Credit
: Mr. Moses Goddard® <Mbigoddard@aol.com> who took all the trouble to mail me these content. As I am not entirely familiar at this lense-type, if you have one of these (or good at it), do supply me some INSPIRING captured images and/or HIGH QUALITY images of the lense to beef up the content in this site (please use either the Nikkor's | Message Board | OR | Nikon F5's Message Board | for initial contact as I check it almost daily.

The Shift Function (±12,4mm') In this operation, the Ions is shifted horizontally (or vertically, when the Ions is revolved) parallel to the film plane. By shifting, you can recompose the frame of the shot without moving the camera. This lets you correct the perspective distortion of the subject or exclude unwanted objects from appearing in front of the main subject. Sea pages 72 to 76 for example photographs using the shift function.

85PCshift1.jpg 85PCshift2.jpg 85PCshift3.jpg
1. Place the camera on a tripod and unlock the shift by turning the shift lock-release knob. 2. While looking through the viewfinder, shift the Ions by turning the shift knob. 3. After the lens is shifted the cleared amount. lack the shift by turning the shift lock-release knob.

Note: When the lens is shifted significantly, the periphery of the viewfinder image can sometimes become dim. To counteract this, close the aperture (choose a larger f-number) before shooting. When Shifting the lens, be Careful not to pinch your fingers between the lens and the grip of the camera body. Shifting and/or tilting the lens to d large degree can cause same vignetting but within approximately 1m (3.3 ft.) of the subject, in this case, no vignetting occurs.

The
Tilt Function (tilt: ±8.3mm') In this operation, the Ions is tilted up and down (or right and left, when the lens is revolved) to the film plane. By tilting, you can obtain clear focus of the entire subject plane when it is not parallel to the film piano. Sea pages 78 to 80 for the example photographs using the tilt function.

85mmPCtilt1.gif 85mmPCtilt2.gif 85mmPCtilt3.gif
1. Place tire camera on a tripod wit unlock the tilt by turning the tilt lock-release knob. * While looking through the viewfinder, tilt the lens by turning the tilt knob.
* Note that tilting the lens also changes the viewfinder image. ** After the Ions is tilted to the desired amount, lock the Ions by turning the tilt lock-release knob. Once the lens is tilted, neither the depth-of-fleld scale nor the distance scale on the lens barrel can be used. Shifting and/or tilting the lens to a large degree can cause same vignetting but within approximately 1m (3.3 ft.) of the subject, in such case, no vignetting occurs.

Revolving Capability (±90°) This operation rotates the lens. By revolving the lens, the shift function can be changed to operate vertically, and the tilt function can be changed to operate horizontally. The lens can be revolved up to 90 degrees right or left.

85mmPCrevolving12.jpg
1. Place the camera on a tripod and slide the revolving lever to hold the lens. - Before rotating the lens, set the shift and tilt to 0 by rotating the shift and tilt knob. 2. Rotate the lens to the desired angle and take your finger off the revolving lever.

* Click stops are provided in 30' steps to both right and left. If revolving is executed with the lens Shifted, be careful not to pinch your fingers between the lens and grip of the camera body. Shifting and/or tilting the lens to a large degree can cause some vignetting but within approximately I m (3.3 ft.) of the subject, no vignetting occurs. Note:on the shift and tilt lock-release knobs The lens does not look completely by turning the shift and tilt lock-release knobs. This is not a malfunction, Turning the shift and tilt lock-release knobs too tightly to lack the lens or forcibly shifting/tilting the lens when it is locked can damage ft.


Aperture Control This lense operates via a preset aperture method. With this method, you must first set the aperture value via the aperture ring. Then, just prior to shooting, you must stop down the lens to the preset aperture using the aperture stop-down button. With this lens, the maximum aperture can be switched to a selected aperture via Mechanical push-button operation. The selected aperture is then held until the button is pushed again.

85mmPCaperture1.jpg 85mmPCaperture2.jpg
Note that even at maximum aperture, the preset aperture value is displayed on the camera body.

Maximum aperture
Stop-down aperture
Focusing 1. Set the shift and tilt amount to 0 by rotating the shift and tilt knobs. 2. If the aperture is set to stop-down aperture, set the aperture to its maximum by pressing the aperture stop-down button. 3. Focus by rotating the focusing ring

Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 side view
Camera's in-focus indicator does not appear properly in the viewfinder when manual focus with electronic rangefinder is performed while shifting or tilting. Focus using the focusing screen's clear matte field. However, when shifting or tilting is not performed, focus can be confirmed using the in-focus indicator . When you shift or tilt after focus is achieved, refocus using the focusing Screen's clear matte field. To confirm the depth of field at set aperture, refer to the depth of field scale on the lens barrel However, when shooting at close distance, correct depth of field cannot be attained from the depth of field scale.

Credit: Image courtesy of Mr. Moses Goddard® <Mbigoddard@aol.com>. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.

85mmPCfocusing.jpg
When the lens is tilted, neither the depth of field scale nor the distance scale can be used. (Both scales can be used when the lens is shifted only).

The aperture value displayed in the LCD panel or viewfinder of the camera may differ from the aperture value set with the lens aperture ring when the focusing ring is rotated. In this case. the aperture value displayed in the LCD panel or viewfinder is the effective aperture.

Determining exposure (using the camera's built-in exposure meter) 1. Set the camera's exposure mode to M (manual). - Set the shift and tilt amount to 0 by rotating the shift and tilt knobs. 2. Press the aperture stop-down button to Set the aperture to Its maximum value. Set the aperture ring to the maximum value f//2.8) as well, and set the shutter speed for correct exposure. When the aperture ring is set to a value other than the maximum (f/2.8), or the lens is shifted or tilted, correct exposure metering and flash exposure metering cannot be conducted. 3. Set the desired aperture by rotating the aperture ring and shift the shutter speed by the same number of steps. 4. Tilt and/or shift the lens, press the aperture stop-down button to stop-down aperture, and then press the shutter release button.

85mmPCexposure1.jpg 85mmPCexposure2.jpg 85mmPCexposure3.jpg 85mmPCexposure4.jpg

85mmPCexposure5.jpg 85mmPCexposure6.jpg
Note: When the lens is shifted and tilted to its maximum value, exposure compensation of approximately +1 step is required. Determining correct exposure with shift and tilt use requires experience. We recommend that you take a series of test shots until you feet comfortable with the operation.
Set the aperture with the lens aperture ring even with a camera that you set aperture with using the command dial. With a camera body with custom setting menu of "aperture setting with lens aperture ring", you do not need to set the option. If the exposure mode is set other then M, incorrect display may appear in the LCD panel and viewfinder.

Determining exposure (with an external exposure meter): 1. Set the camera's exposure mode to M (manual). 2. Tilt or shift the lens. 3. Set the aperture ring to the desired aperture and read the aperture value displayed in the camera's LCD panel. Then, input the aperture value to the external exposure Meter to determine exposure and press the shutter release button.

PC Micro Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 Vertical view

Note: When the lens is shifted and tilted to its maximum value, exposure compensation of approximately -1 step is required. Stop-down aperture when shooting. Determining correct exposure with shift and tilt use requires experience. We recommend that you take a series of test shots until you feel comfortable with the operation. When you are using a camera that does not have an LCD panel, read the aperture value on the aperture ring, set the value to the external exposure meter, and then determine shutter speed considering the effective aperture. The effective aperture becomes approximately 1 step darker at closest focusing distance.

Lens Care When the lens is not in use, set the tilt and shift amount to "0" since it has many moving parts, and can thus be easily soiled by dust or dirt. Clean the lens surface with a blower brush. To remove dirt and smudges, use a soft, clean cotton cloth or a lens tissue moistened with ethane (alcohol) or lens cleaner. Wipe in a circular motion from the center to outer edge, taking care not to leave smears or to touch other parts of the lens. If you use ether in cleaning the lens, smudges can sometimes appear on the surface of the lens. If this happens. wipe it again with a cotton cloth moistened with alcohol. Never use thinner or benzene to clean the lens.


Credit: Image courtesy of Jeff@photocreative@ EBAY STORE ®Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

* To protect the lens surface from dirt or damage, we recommend using an NC filter at all times. The lens hood also helps to protect the lens. * Keep the lens cap in place whenever the lens is not in use. * If you will not use the lens for a long time, protect it from rust and mold by storing it in a cool, dry place. Also, do not store in direct sunlight, and keep it away from naphthalene or camphor. * Be careful not to get the lens wet or drop it in water. If water gets on the lens, this may cause it to malfunction.

Technical Specifications :-

Type of lense: D-type Manual Focus PC (Perspective Control) lense with close-up capability, a built-in CPU with shift: ±12,4mm, tilt: ±8.3mm as well as revolving (±90°) capability. Focal length / Maximum / Minimum aperture: 85mm / 1/2.8 to f/45

Nikon PC Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 Optical construction PCmicroMTF.gif
Lens construction: 6 elements in 5 groups
Picture angle: Diagonal: 28
° 30', Vertical: 16°, Horizontal; 23° 50'
Maximum reproduction ratio: 1:2 (at 0.39m)

<
<<--- Credit: Nikon publicly published the MTF graphs, a way to show their confidence in the design of this superlative micro-zoom. The original images for the MTF can be accessed from Nikon Japan website by clicking here - if they are still available (2005).

Distance scale: Graduated in meters and feet from 0.39m (1.3 ft) to infinity (OO)
Distance information: Output into camera body
Aperture scale: 1/2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32 and 45
Aperture method: Preset aperture
Lens movement: shift and tilt movement at right angles (the two operations can be modified for a surcharge, to move in the same (parallel) direction)
PC Micro Nikkor 85mm f/2.8 setup accessories
Maximum shift mount: ±12,4 mm
Maximum tilt amount:
±8.3mm
Image circle: 68mm diameter, Overall picture angle: 43
° 40'
Lens rotation: 90' right and left (click-stop in each step)
Mount: Nikon bayonet mount
Lens Hood: HB-22
Attachment size: 77nm (P=0.75mm)
Dimensions: approx. 83.5mm (3.3 in.) dia. x 109.5mm (4.3 in.) extension from the camera's lens mounting flange; overall length is approx. 118mm (4.6 in.)
Weight: approx. 775g (27.3 oz.)
Usable Tele-Converter(s):
TC-14Bs, AF-3, AF4

Credit: Image courtesy of Jeff@photocreative@ EBAY STORE ®Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

Accessories Supplied: Hard case CL-75; 77mm lens cap; Rear lens cap LF-1 Optional: 77mm screw-in filters; 77mm bayonet lens hood HB-22; Tripod adapter AH-5 (Recommended when the tripod interferes with the lense).

| Back to Nikon F5's Macro-Photography section | or
| Main Index Page | Nikon PC-Nikkor lenses | Main Index Page- AF Nikkor lenses

PC-Nikkor at 28mm Focal length: PC-Nikkor 28mm f/4.0 | PC-Nikkor 28mm f/3.5
PC-Nikkor at 35mm Focal length: PC-Nikkor 35mm f/3.5 | PC-Nikkor 35mm f/2.8
PC-Nikkor at other Focal length: PC-Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8D

| Relative: Various Nikkor wideangles at 28mm & 35mm focal length | AF-D Micro 200mm f/4.0s IF-ED | AF-D Zoom Micro-Nikkor 70-180mm f/4.5-f/5.6 ED | AF-D Micro 105mm f/2.8s | AF-D Micro 60mn f/2.8s | PC-Micro-Nikkor 85mm f/2.8D | MF Micro-Nikkor 55mm | MF Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 | f/4.0 | MF Micro-Nikkor 200mm f/4.0s IF | MF Medical-Nikkor 120mm f/4.0s | Medical-Nikkor 250mm f/5.6 | MF Bellow Nikkor 105mm f/4.0 | Bellow-Nikkor 135mm f/4.0 preset | UV-Nikkor 55mm f/4.0 | UV-Nikkor 105mm f/4.0s

Micro-Nikkor lense Family: Main Index Page (3 parts)
|
50mm | 55mm (AF) | 60mm (AF) | 85mm PC | MF-105mm (AF) | MF-200mm (AF) | 70-180mm (AF) |

| Message Board | for your Nikkor Optics in a shared environment
| Message Board | Specifically for Dispose or Looking for new/used Nikon/Nikkor photographic equipment

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Nikon MF RF-Nikkor lenses for Rangefinder cameras:- Main Index Page
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Nikon Manual Focus Nikkor lenses:-
Fisheye-Nikkor Lenses - Circular | Full Frame | Ultrawides Lenses - 13mm15mm18mm20mm | Wideangle Lenses - 24mm28mm35mm | Standard Lenses - 45mm 50mm 58mm | Telephoto Lenses - 85mm105mm135mm180mm & 200mm | Super-Telephoto Lenses - 300mm 400mm 500mm 600mm 800mm 1200mm |

Nikkor Link.jpg   Special Application lenses:
Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
Reflex-Nikkor Lenses - 500mm 1000mm 2000mm
Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

Tele-Converters: TC-1 | TC-2 | TC-200 | TC-201 | TC-300 | TC-301 | TC-14 | TC-14A | TC-14B | TC-14C | TC-14E | TC-16 | TC-16A | TC-20E

Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-153.html by: my friend, Rick Oleson
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

Recommended Reading Reference on Nikon cameras and Nikkor lenses | about this photographic web site

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leofoo.Gif Co-developed with my web buddy, Rick Oleson® & LARs.Gif Denmark, Creator of the Nikon Repair Group Mailing-List; A contributing effort to Michael Liu's Classic Nikon SLRs and Nikkor optic site.

Credit: MCLau®, who has helped to rewrite some of the content appeared this site. Chuck Hester® who has been helping me all along with the development of all these Nikon websites; Lars Holst Hansen, 'Hawkeye' who shares the same passion I have; Ms Rissa, Sales manager from Nikon Corporation Malaysia for granting permission to use some of the official content; Ted Wengelaar, Holland who has helped to provide many useful input relating to older Nikkor lenses; Some of the references on production serial numbers used in this site were extracted from Roland Vink's website; Hiura Shinsaku from Nikomat Club Japan. Lastly, to all the good people who has contributed their own expeience, resources or kind enough granted permission to use their images of their respective optic in this site. It is also a site to remember a long lost friend on the Net. Note:certain content and images appeared in this site were either scanned from official marketing leaflets & brochures published by Nikon and/or contribution from surfers who claimed originality of their work for educational purposes. The creator of the site will not be responsible for may discrepancies arise from such dispute except rectifying them after verification. "Nikon", "Nikkormat", "Nippon Kokagu KK" & "Nikkor" are registered tradename of Nikon Corporation Inc., Japan. Site made with an Apple IMac.