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Nikon's Autofocus (AF) Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D MACRO
Autofocus (AF) Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6G wideangle-telephoto Zoom Lenses

 
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2nd draft 11th August 2007. Needs further re-editing, not ready yet.

Nikon's Autofocus (AF) Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D MACRO wideangle-telephoto zoom lens
Year introduced: Sept. 1995; Discontinued: 1998/9


During the mid of the '80, Nikon used to offer an excellent old version of the wide-telephoto zoom lens AF Zoom Nikkor 28-85mm f/3.5~4.5s MACRO which was introduced among the original series of AF Nikkor lenses for the Nikon F501 (N2020) in 1986 . It was the only AF Nikkor Zoom lens within the early AF Nikkor lens group which extended its picture angle of Nikkor zoom with a wideangle reach of 28mm's 74° field of view. So, it made a good supplementary zoom for the early Nikon AF SLRs during those early days. For those who may be seeking a wideangle zoom beyond 74° field of view, Nikon offered an alternate AF Zoom Nikkor 24-50mm f/3.3~4.5s which was introduced a year later after the debut of the F501 in 1987. The original AF Zoom Nikkor 28-85mm f/3.5~4.5S MACRO MK I was updated later with a wider manual focusing ring as well as other minor cosmetic changes. The said zoom was eventually being discontinued in 1999 because back in 1995, Nikon has began developed another very compact and lightweight zoom lens with an integrating distance chip inside the lens which enabled the new zoom lens provides full compatibility with those Nikon SLR cameras that began offering 3D Matrix Metering. The original 28-85mm AF Nikkor Zoom lens was not that fortunate and has never enjoyed the same benefit as with the Distance chip enabled AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D zoom lens that we featured here.

Technically speaking, other than enabling 3D Matrix Metering with compatible Nikon bodies, as well as it has a far compact and lightweight body in comparison with the previous model, but in terms of basic lens specification, the newer version of the D-spec 28-80mm autofocus Nikkor Zoom has no significant advantages over the predecessor But both lenses were being marketed along with each other and amazingly, both of these AF Nikkor Zoom lenses were actually still being on sale in the Nikkor lens group that stretched across a period from 1992 (28-85 MK II), 1995 (28-80 MK I) to 1999 (MK II) and extended until UNTIL 2006. Along with another AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6G which has a slightly different optical structure and configuration; so, the AF Nikkor zoom lens group was actually having three AF Nikkor Zoom lenses for photographers to choose from at this specific zoom range (the revised model of 28-85mm f/3.5~4.5 which was the only 28-8X zoom lens category that doesn't supported with a D-Spec.). Today, while the standard zoom may has been shifted to an even wider start up picture angle of 24mm but these series of 28-85mm AF Nikkor zoom series probably have served many photographers happily over the last few decades. Updated: Even the ulltra-compact AF-G 28-80mm was not spared in a broad scale streamlining of products by Nikon, where the lens has also being announced its discontinuation in 2006.

Nikon's AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D  wideangle-telephoto zoom lens - first version, 1995
But one may ask why this compact zoom can enjoy such a long life span in its product cycle ? This can be explained as Nikon simply needs a budget zoom lens that can help lure in first time SLR buyer to own a practical yet affordable zoom lens for their camera as usually, most people who may be getting their first single lens reflex camera (film or digital) often likes to do some comparisons between brands and lens type and most importantly, the bundled price with the basic camera body where this may make the difference in a purchase decision. So, it simply means the 28-80mm zoom lens was like a standard zoom designed as a a package optic for an entry level Nikon to tempt first time SLR buyer to get into the Nikon 35mm SLR system.

With a startup wideangle focal length at 28mm, on-site sales assistant at the retail outlets may be easier to convince a potential buyer. The tele-focal length of 80mm should look good when peeping through the finder for the first time and inexperienced buyers may not care about the differences such as its diminishing variable aperture value from 3.5 to f/5.6 from wideangle to telephoto. Compactness and lightweight is another major sales factor help to push for a close deal . I guess regardless if it is a Canon, Pentax or Nikon, every major player in the market know the trick how to help retailers at the point of sale to persuade customers. The business theory can be simple. As long as someone is hooked on, manufacturer can slowly milk the hooked ones for future system upgrade in the many long years to come. The sales figures accumulated over the years may have provided Nikon which are the hot selling products in their line up as well as decides which "product" in their lineup to stay or phase out. Overall, I guess this is just a commercial decision where you need not to be so sentimental about all these happenings or decision they made. After all, Nikon does need to survive in this highly competitive market place, agree ?

Credit: Image(s) displayed herein courtesy of JIN-Zhang® UK. Some of them are extracted from his popular CameraqEXT@EBAY STORE. Image(s) copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Despite this, the AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D lens does has something for you to considered as a pretty good zoom lens. Firstly, it was introduced as a native AF-D spec optic where it integrates with an encoding microchip within that constantly feeding focusing distance information to the camera body, this information is used to enhance the accuracy of the cameras exposure and flash metering systems. The 3D Matrix Metering system in a compatible Nikon SLR camera requires such distance information for precise calculation of metering/exposure control. Minus this fact it has quite up-to-date functions that enabling full functional operation with Nikon bodies that provides 3D Matrix Metering, it does provides some degree of backward compatibility for older Nikon SLRs too such as it will work equally well to deliver basic Matrix metering or Balance Fill flash control for older Nikon AF SLR bodies such as Nikon F4, N90(x) etc. As for manual focus Nikon SLRs users who may like the practical zoom range it provides, there is an aperture ring as well as a manual focus ring to provide full manual or semi-automatic AE operation with any Ai-Spec Nikon SLR cameras produced thus far. Well, to pick on something within the design, the manual focusing with this lens is not comfortable to use at all because it has a very narrow ring for operation. Strangely as I can say, after all these years (especially after the bitter episode of the mid to end of the '80 where most early series AF Nikkor lenses had also faced the same dilemma of a thin, narrow manual focusing ring design. Users during those days were quite resistant to these which actually had forced Nikon to redesign their entire series of AF lenses with a broader ring to counter these negative criticism); BUT - seemingly Nikon has not learnt from the past and replicated the same POORLY design manual focusing ring onto many of the new AF zoom lenses again. Is this a big issue ? Not quite, I guess AF users may not be feeling any significant in this design but if you intend to executive manual focus control with this zoom lens with an older MF Nikon bodies such as Nikon F3, Nikon FM2N or FM3A etc. this thin and fragile plastic strip is simply one stupid design you can find on this zoom lens. Well, I am not exaggerating this issue but in 1999, AGAIN Nikon has to waste their time to patch this flaw in their next upgrade a few years later to please Nikon users who asked for improvement of this zoom lens. Aren't they stupid and forgetful at times ?

Inner Mongolia, entrance to a nomad hut, China
Entrance to a snow filled nomad huts location, Inner Mongolia, China.

Leofoo® 2007

Interim photo ONLY. Looking for contributing images to replace this.

This compact and lightweight autofocus Nikkor zoom lens uses a rotating zoom design where you turn the zoom ring to adjust the focal length. Four most frequently used focal length of 28mm, 35mm, 50mm and 80mm are printed at the zoom ring for a quick and easy visual reference when you zooming in or out for the desired selection. Basically, it offers an approx. 2.9X zoom ratio. While autofocus is camera driven and Nikon smartly designed the lens with a bare minimum lens elements within (8 elements in 8 groups design). In a way, it helps to make autofocusing faster, smoother and accurately executed. However, considering it has a step down maximum aperture of f/5.6 at 80mm which is technically quite useless except it provides a reach - so, despite in one area they did a good job but cannot delivers the other. This little Zoom lens has a 58mm filter thread and hence it cannot shares most standard 52mm filter accessories, which makes sharing other filter accessories with a small, real issue. Although the lens has not been mentioned having a MACRO mode but amazing this tiny zoom can actually focuses down to 0.4m (approx. 1.3') and delivers an equally impressive 1:3.8 magnification ratio. The picture angle is 74° - 30° 10 for 35mm full format shooting but magnifies as an approx. 53° - 20° as well as replicates itself as an equivalent of 42-120mm zoom lens when using it with a Nikon 1.5X DX format Digital SLR camera.

Although when we evaluate issues from a different perspective this lens may not be having the most desirable feature in its lens specification but it surprisingly delivers an above average image quality in the most basic formation as a zoom lens. The early version that I tested was acquired by a friend for this Nikon F65QD. The series of sample shots taken in a late afternoon consistently exhibited high contrast and sharp pictures after processing. Towards the late evening, its weakness began to reveal in its lack of lens speed at the longer focal length range where I have to find for support to hold the shot steadily (the 28-35mm is still manageable for handheld shooting when when the night begin drawing in). The fill-in flash on the camera may provide as a form of compensation for such need. Anyway, for most general photography under a favorable light condition, this lens surprisingly is a performer. Anyway, this Nikkor zoom is primarily being designed for mobility and affordability. The trick is to understand where it performs at its best and counter its weaknesses via experience So, just think of alternative way to shoot when situation that may call for some logical thinking to offset its limitations. Well, come to think of it, what is not appealing in it may also indirectly forcing you to pick up how to tackle issues and you can learn from here as a photographer. Just remember , this lens has a very useful 28mm wideangle and you may find it in particularly useful for many applications such as shooting tight interior shots, individual or group portraits. Generally, it is a wonderful lens for scenic capture on location, street photography, architecture, travel and family outings; It is also an excellent lens at its 80mm for half length body portrait or for isolating a section within a scene for more interesting composition. As the effective aperture is f/5.6 onwards, depth of field control may not be as flexible for truly creative use. So, always try to choose a simple background that is less confusing for photography which may minimize this weakness. Lastly, due to lack of lens speed in this zoom lens, to counter any possible camera shake, a good way is to compensate this by selecting a film type with a faster rating (such as ASA 200 or 400). For digital SLR user, this should be automatically shifted to high ASA if light level drops and counter this problem (if it doesn't work, try set the camera sensitivity control to manual override or push the ASA value at a higher rating).

Nikon's AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D MACRO MK/Ver. II wideangle-telephoto zoom lens Year introduced: 1999; Discontinued: 2006

In 1999. Nikon updated this popular compact Nikkor zoom simply by designing the lens with a wider manual focusing ring to counter growing criticism for the lack of consideration when shooting pictures with manual focusing. Although it didn't affect other areas in the basic lens design, but the change made has indirectly improved both lens appearance as well as functional control of it in lens handling . Users who may often require using manual focusing now has a better grip with the improved manual focusing ring where it should provide a more assuring feel with when performs manual focusing - don't forget, as this lens has eliminate the distance scales window, so this AF Nikkor zoom does NOT has a visible distance scales for you to refer where you just has to rely the finder to hunt or confirm the focusing. This may apply for situations such as situation such as macro/close-up or shooting at low level angle shooting etc. So, the a more comfortable to use manual focusing ring design is always a preferred feature in any lens.

Nikon F80/N80 with AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D wideangle-telephoto zoom lens. Version II , 1999
I am not sure why, but seemingly it gives me the impression Nikon designers OFTEN makes odd assumption how owners of this zoom would be using for their photography. Yes, you may presume nowadays, who would still need to revert back to manual focusing where there is the convenience of autofocusing? But that is not the issue because if a lens designer concludes matters on his own, why don't you totally eliminate option for manual focusing at all ? IF they think MF should be a retained option in a lens, then all I am asking is, just provides a functional way for people to use it. The whole trouble is, they simply treat a feature in a lens as a sales element rather than designing a feature in anticipating how a photographer would be using it. So, isn't it at times what I am annoyed about has some basis to voice my anger ?

During late '90, Nikon seemingly has strike a winning formula commercially with the
Nikon F80QD after the Nikon F100. The F80 class models and equivalent have helped Nikon created a new pool of Nikon autofocus SLR users. With a new Multi-CAM 900 AF Sensor, the superbly crafted F80Q has an exclusive cross-ranged, 5 areas AF sensor and other superior operational modes has, in a way began to make photographers less dependence on necessity of a distance scales window on the lens. But I guess a lens feature is still a feature and the AF 28-80 is not specifically being designed for use as a dedicated F80 zoom lens alone while omitting others' need, isn't it ?

In relation to its performance, the question of whether if this a good zoom lens is not the main issue because no matter how, this lens delivers bare minimum expectation of a Nikkor quality. Most people find its basic features are quite adequate to use it for a wide varieties of photographic usage. For those who may be just started getting into serious photography, this lens is a good entry zoom for them to explore many photographic possibilities. I am not a reviewer, and neither I have the expertise to judge. So, I will leave this issue to photographers to tell you their experiences with this zoom lens. Good or bad - I guess it has a lot to do with the photographer individually and how to perceive things he sees in the viewfinder before he trips the shutter release. Put this lens in the hand of a creative photographer, it may deliver some excellently executed visual; if not, it may just confine itself as a normal zoom lens. Overall, based on logical thinking, Nikon is not entirely a stupid manufacturer and they possess all the accumulated expertise and know-how in how to offer a basic zoom lens that may help their camera to sell well commercially. So, regardless how bad they can be in a design, but I would assume optically, where Nikon is best at - should still be able to deliver an above average performer in an entry level zoom lens. You may think it is a compliment but as I have pointed a fact earlier, although NOT all Nikkor lenses are termed to be a classic but to them, delivering a popular zoom lens with acceptable optical performance is not a too difficult job either for them.

AF Nikkor Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D MK II Side view Side view of a Nikon AF Nikkor Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D Version II, 1999

OFF TOPIC:- Sometimes people often asked why some classes of lenses are being termed or classified as "budget" or "entry level" optic. Well , Nikon used to think their Nikkor lenses may be potentially used encountering thousand times in lens interchanging. So, a more rugged metal rear lens mount should be used to endure such abuse physically. Here, I would rather interpret lenses which use alternative harden plastic rear lens mount are not designed for "long lasting and frequently lens changing" or " .. users that may not be too active in photography...and they don't need a durable rear end for a lens..". . Such category of lenses usually has a basic polycarobonate or hybrid built quality, and many them also do not even offered with a visible distance scales marked on the lens with some other omission of features such as DOF scales, metal filter thread and so forth. So if Nikon can only offer these lens spec onto a Nikkor lens, why would you ask me this question then ?

The rear all black hardened plastic lens mount of a Nikon AF Nikkor Zoom 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D Version II, 1999
Next, as both versions of this AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D were believed to have been produced from the Nikon factory in Thailand (but REMEMBER it has nothing to do with the Thai, as they didn't designed or determined the lens spec - but only leased out some industrial plots to Nikon to built the optical plant / assembling lines). So, it should not be conclusive since it was a third world country product and that was why it has so little consideration for photographers here. Peace...

Credit: Images courtesy of Melissa Bowen from Shutterblade ® the Company operates a Buy/Sell trading website on their own. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

Lake front ... by ARUNA Kalutanthri
Lake front

Credit: Image copyright 2007 ARUNA Kalutanthri from Ottawa, Canada. All rights reserved. You can access Aruna's portfolio at Pbase for more creative visuals. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.



Technical Specification for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D wideangle-telephoto zoom lens:-

Type of lense: Autofocus Nikkor wide-telephoto zoom lens with built-in CPU and an all black hardened plastic rear Nikon bayonet mount
Focal length: 28mm to 80mm;
approx. 42-120mm on a DX format Digital SLR cameras
Maximum aperture
: f/3.5; (28mm=1:3.5; approx. 50mm=1:4.5; 85mm=1:5.6) Minimum Aperture: f/22
Lens construction:
8 elements in 8 groups
Picture angle:
74° - 28° 30'; 53° - 20° for DX format Digital SLR cameras
Focal length scale: 28mm, 35mm, 50mm and 80mm
Diaphragm: Fully automatic,
Focus control: Camera driven AF, Manual focus via a separate manual focusing ring at the front end
Zoom control: Via rotating zoom ring
at the center of the lens barrel
Distance scale: 0.4m (1.3') at normal focus to infinity (OO) but not shown
Distance information: Output into camera body with CPU interface system
IS FULLY FUNCTIONAL with this lens; Option for manual focus provided
Aperture scale:
f/3.5, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16 and 22 on both standard and aperture-direct-readout scales
Mount: Nikon bayonet mount with CPU contacts;
Attachment size
: 58mm (P=0.75mm);

Optical Design for Nion AF zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D zoom lens
Distance Scale: NONE
Meter Coupling Prong: NONE
Depth of Field Scales: NONE
Infrared compensation index: NONE
Reproduction ratio: 1:3.8 maximum @0.4m (1.3')
Minimum aperture lock: Provided. Via a slide switch
Lens Coating
: assume to be SIC (Nikon Super Integrated lens Coating)
Exposure measurement:
Via full-aperture method with Ai cameras or cameras with CPU interface system; via stop-down method for other cameras

Standard accessories: 58mm front lens cap; Rear lens cap LF-1; lens case CL-49
Optional Accessories:
58mm screw-in filters; Bayonet hood HB-20; Flexible lens pouch No.62. CP 9 may also be possible
Dimensions: Approx. 65mm dia. x 79.5mm (approx. 2.6" x 3.1")
Weight: Approx. 265g (approx. 9.3 oz)

Usable Tele-Converters: - TC-201S; TC-14A. Note: the combination of the said TC with the AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D only offer in MANUAL focus only); Nikon does not encourage the use of early AF Te-converter TC-16S with this AF zoom. * Other information: Compatibility: full system compatibility with any Nikon SLR that provides 3D Matrix Metering for ambient and flash; retains basic Matrix Metering with other Nikon SLRs. This lens cannot be used with AF Finder DX-1 attached to the Nikon F3AF camera. Starting Serial Numbers for these versions could have been began from:-
AF 28-80/3.5-5.6 D plastic mount, narrow focus, Thailand 3+ 200001 < 201292 - 312554 > Sep95 - 1999 112554
AF 28-80/3.5-5.6 D N plastic mount, wide focus, Thailand 3+ 2000001 < 2016172 - 2608597 > 1999 - Apr01 608597
Reference: Roland Vink's lens data sheet.

Nikon's AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6G wideangle-telephoto zoom lens
Year introduced: 2001; Discontinued:
2006

Admittedly, I am not a big fan for this compact, lightweight Nikkor wide-tele zoom lens but still, I have to complete a section where I started. To begin with.. a sigh... just when you thought the thin and fragile manual focusing ring issue on the original 28-80mm AF-D has been patched with the MK II version; Nikon has introduced another AF-G Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D which reverted back to an old design of a thin manual focusing ring again in this aperture ring-less zoom lens. To some of us, the AF-G Nikkor lenses signal the departure of a commitment to old time photographers who still may be using dual system of MF and AF Nikon bodies because currently, most of the lens development effort are concentrating onto the new series of G-series Nikkor optic as well as Digital based Nikon bodies and these series of the AF Nikkor lenses provide little backward system compatibility for an older MF Nikon SLRs. To the new generation Nikon SLR users, the AF-G lenses also have a basic Nikon D-type design for precise distance information for flash and ambient light exposure processes but these new series of AF Nikkor lenses have REMOVED the conventional aperture ring found on a traditional design in a Nikkor lens. The G-spec Nikkor lenses are specifically designed for Nikon SLR cameras that use Sub-Command dial* for controlling apertures electronically. Although we all know this migration path is inevitable as it actually offers a better and more responsive handling as well as during shooting on adjustment of exposure control or activation / shifting other operational modes during shooting but removal of aperture ring is it a necessity ? * Note: The design was first introduced with the Canon T90 in 1986; subsequently, virtually all Canon EOS SLRs has this built-in. Nikon F5 was the first Nikon SLR camera that began adopting this Sub-Command Dial feature.

A lovely view of a Nikon AF-G Nikkor Zoom 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D ultra-compact wide-telephoto zoom lens, 2001
What is a G-spec Nikkor lens ?

AF-G lenses where introduced in 2000, these lenses are similar to AF-D lenses and offer the same functionality as AF-D lenses but do not feature an aperture ring. (an aperture ring is only required by older Nikon SLR cameras which can't detect this information from the lens). Initially only inexpensive Nikon lenses were available as AF- G lenses, however since then Nikon has launched several AF-G lenses including series of professional class AF-S lenses and will continue to introduce new AF-G lenses across the Nikkor range. The only difference between Nikon AF-D and AF-G lenses is that AF-G have no aperture ring. Nikon claimed studies have revealed that few professionals are now using lenses with aperture rings, the ability to electronically adjust exposures by 1/3 stop via the command dials far out performs manual ring adjustment, however experienced the user may be.

Credit: Image(s) displayed herein courtesy of JIN-Zhang® UK. Some of them are extracted from his popular CameraqEXT@EBAY STORE. Image(s) copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

TO NIKON, a substantial weight saving (cost in production) is a secondary benefit to them too. G-type lenses like D-type lenses transmit distance information to the camera for 3D Matrix metering systems. The absence of an aperture ring affects the compatibility of the lens with certain cameras, see the chart below of camera exposure mode compatibility with G type lenses:-

Available models / Exposure control Mode

Fully Automatic modes*
P, Auto, Digital Vari-program

Shutter
Priority AE

Aperture
Priority AE

Full Manual
exposure (M)

Nikon D2 series, D1 series, D200, D100, D80, D70s, D70, D50, F5, F100, F80, F75, F65, F55, F60, F50, F-401/S/X, PRONEA S, PRONEA 600i.

possible

possible

possible

possible

Nikon F4, F90/X, F70, F-801/s, F-601M

possible

possible

Not compatible

Not compatible

F-601, F-501, F301, Nikon F, F2, F3, F3AF, FE, FE2, FM, FM2/n, FM3A, Nikon FA etc.

Not compatible

Not compatible

Not compatible

Not compatible

* The availability of Vari-Program and AUTO mode depending on model. Refer to | THIS LINK | for individual link to each model mentioned above.

Unless there are updated events in the future, we assume all the available AF-G Zoom Nikkor 28-85mm f/3.3~5.6D versions are also being produced by Nikon's optical plant in Thailand. Physically, this Nikkor AF-G zoom lens has a marginally larger lens opening of a f/3.3 at its longest focal length at 80mm where it makes the difference with the previous AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D (1995). However, as of 03.2007; both the AF-G f/3.3~5.6D and AF-D 3.5~5.6D were still being marketed along with each other. Updated: Even the ulltra-compact AF-G 28-80mm was not spared in a broad scale streamlining of its Nikkor lens products, as Nikon had also included this lens in its announced of discontinuation of products in 2006. One of the technical highlight of this ultra-compact, extremely lightweight Nikkor zoom was the use of a new and simpler optical composition in a 6 elements in 6 group design (the comparing AF-D f/3.5~5.6D uses a 8E/8G composition). The reduction of lens element in the design was made possible via the use of an Hybrid-type ( molded acrylic) Aspherical lens element. However, despite the difference in the optical structure between the two versions, most of the technological highlights in the previous AF-D zoom lens can also be found in this AF-G zoom - and actually being added with some extras. Firstly, the camera only weighs 195g (or approx. 6.9 oz ; comparing AF-D weighs 265g) - obviously courtesy from removal of aperture ring as well as a simpler optical design within. Next, it measures merely 66.5mm x 64mm (or approx. 2.6" x 2.5"; AF-D version measures 65mm dia. x 79.5mm or 2.6" x 3.1") and makes it even more compact than before. Neither its close focus performance has been compromised; where the AF-G Zoom has a marked minimum focus distance at 0.35m (1.1'); delivering a maximum 1:3.5 magnification ratio @ 80mm (comparing AF-D version performs at 0.4m for 1:3.8). The AF-G is still having a 58mm filter thread (plastic) as well as sharing the same hardened all-black plastic rear lens mount found in the previous AF-D version; although it feels rigid as a whole when view it from a distance but you cannot shrewd off the heavy plastic feel of it once you got hold it in your hand.

The wall.. by Armindo Lopes
The wall at the water park.

Credit: Image copyright 2007 Armindo Lopes from Portugal. All rights reserved. You can access Armindo's portfolio at Pbase for more creative visuals. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Silver gray version of Nikon's AF-G Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D  wideangle-telephoto zoom lens Nikon's AF-G Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5~5.6D  wideangle-telephoto zoom lens black Version
Next, interesting enough, Nikon offers both a satin black finish as well as a silvery-gray version as alternative to fit individual preference or as matching lens for their black or silver bodied Nikon bodies.

Note: The front element turns during focusing so using a special filters such as circular polarizer may require additional step.

Technically, except for the immediate felt in reduction of weight and dimension; there is much nothing to shout about in this G-spec Nikkor zoom lens as compare to the comparing AF-D version. For consumers, it retails at approx. USD130-00 and may fit many photographer's budget easily. Some actually think it is a good combo to go along with an AF-G 70-300mm f/4.0~5.6D Nikkor tele-zoom lens but the latter commands roughly at a much higher price (about USD300-00) where both adds up will shoot beyond USD450-00 and this is minus the cost of a camera body. How does the lens performs optically ? you can access for some opinion by owners / reviewers that I have complied below as reading reference. But logical thinking will tell, regardless of how bad it can be, but most Nikkor zoom lenses should be able to deliver more than acceptable optical performances. Considering with the modest price, it should be a real bargain as an entry level zoom lens when couples it with a budget Nikon SLR, this basic combination may make a good entry to begin a photography journal.

Technical Specification for Nikon AF-G Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D ultra-compact wideangle-telephoto zoom lens:-

Type of lense: Autofocus Nikkor wide-telephoto zoom lens with built-in CPU and an all-black hardened plastic rear Nikon bayonet mount
Focal length: 28mm to 80mm;
approx. 42-120mm on a DX format Digital SLR cameras
Maximum aperture
: f/3.3; (28mm=1:3.3; approx. 50mm=1:4.5; 85mm=1:5.6) Minimum Aperture: f/22
Lens construction
:
8 elements in 8 groups
Picture angle:
74° - 28° 30'; 53° - 20° for DX format Digital SLR cameras
Focal length scale: 28mm, 35mm, 50mm and 80mm
Diaphragm: Fully automatic; 7 rounded diaphragm blades
Focus control: Camera driven AF, Manual focus is possible via a separate manual focusing ring at the front end

Silver version of the Nikon AF-G zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D zoom lens plastic Rear lens mount Silver version of the Nikon AF-G zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D zoom lens
Focus confirmation:- via camera finder for both AF and MF
Zoom control: Via rotating zoom ring
locates at the center of the lens barrel
Minimum focusing distance:- 0.35m (1.1') at normal focus to infinity (OO)
but not shown as lack of distance scales display

Credit: Image(s) displayed herein courtesy of ROkas_photo@EBAY. Image(s) copyright © 2006. All rights reserved.

Distance information: Output into camera body with CPU interface system IS FULLY FUNCTIONAL with this lens;
Aperture scales:
control via camera finder or LCD display, in 1/3 refined steps
Mount: Nikon bayonet mount with CPU contacts;
Attachment size
: 58mm (P=0.75mm);

Optical Design for Nion AF-G zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D zoom lens MTF chart for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6G wide-tele zoom lens MTF chart for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6G wide-tele zoom lens wide angle setting
Distance Scales: NONE
Meter Coupling Prong: NONE
Depth of Field Scales: NONE
Minimum aperture lock: NONE
Infrared compensation index: NONE
Reproduction ratio: 1:3.5 maximum @0.35m (1.1') (80mm)

Lens Coating: SIC (Nikon Super Integrated lens Coating)
Exposure measurement:
Via full-aperture method with cameras with CPU interface system
Standard accessories: 58mm front lens cap; Rear lens cap LF-1;
Optional Accessories:
58mm screw-in filters; Bayonet hood HB-20; lens case CL-49, CL-S1, CL-32S and Flexible lens pouch No.62., CP 9 may also be possible
Dimensions: Approx. 66.5mm x 64mm or approx. 2.6" x 2.5"
Weight: Approx.
195g or approx. 6.9 oz

Rear section view of the plastic lens mount of a Nikon AF-G zoom Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.3~5.6D zoom lens
Usable Tele-Converters: - Nikon does not suggest any TC for this lens. * Other information: Starting Serial Numbers for these versions could have been began from:-
AF 28-80/3.3-5.6 G plastic mount, Thailand 3+ 2000001 < 2382672 - 3112036 > > Feb01 - > 1112036
AF 28-100/3.5-5.6 G plastic mount, Thailand 3+ 2000001 < 2010311 - 2290234 > Feb02 - 2006 290234
Reference: Roland Vink's lens data sheett.

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Credit: Image(s) displayed herein courtesy of JIN-Zhang® UK. Some of them are extracted from his popular CameraqEXT@EBAY STORE. Image(s) copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

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Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
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Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

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Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-153.html by: my friend, Rick Oleson
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

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Credit: To all the good people who has contributed their own experience, resources or those who are kind enough granting us permission to use their images appeared in this site Note:certain content and images appeared in this site were either scanned from official marketing leaflets, brochures, sales manuals or publications published by Nikon over the years and/or contribution from surfers who claimed originality of their work for educational purposes. The creator of the site will not be responsible for may discrepancies arise from such dispute except rectifying them after verification."Nikon", "Nikkormat", "Nippon Kokagu KK" & "Nikkor" are registered tradename of Nikon Corporation Inc., Japan. Site made with an Apple IMac.