Additional Information on
Nikkor AF (autofocus) Zoom-Nikkor 70-300mm f4-5.6D ED Telephoto Zoom lens

 
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Nikon Autofocus (AF) Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED telephoto zoom lens
Introduced: February, 1989; Discontinued: 1998

By 1998, the very well made AF Zoom-Nikkor 75-300mm f/4.5~5.6S with its 4X zoom ratio Nikkor zoom lens has been around to serve Nikon photographers for almost a decade. With the prevailing technologies for both lenses and camera advanced in such a rapid pace, everyone was anticipating there probably would be an upgrade to this time honored Nikkor zoom lens. They were not disappointed as the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED was eventually being announced in January, 1998. Its debut was at a time during post Asian financial crises and for most people outside the continent may take note of it but for those residing around the far east region, probably might not.


Update: Michael Rhode had supplied inofrmation on a previously unheard version of AF Nikkor 70~300mm f/4~5.6D Non-ED zoom lens

Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED telephoto zoom lens Front element of Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED telephoto zoom lens

Credit: Image courtesy of Laura Kornylak ® <shutterblade@comcast.net> from shutterblade*com where the Company has a website on its own. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Based on spec sheet alone, the lens seemingly was a worthy upgrade. The lens speed was marginally brighter (f/4.0 from f/4.5), focal length was lengthen slightly from 70mm to 75mm, while the zoom ratio was slightly extended to 4.3X (4.285X) from the original 4X. Comparing the weight, the new update is far lighter and posted in a very compact dimension than the predecessor. But for photographers who may be using the newer series of Nikon SLR, the significant part was - the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED was introduced genetically as a D-spec Nikkor zoom lens. This has enabled the lens fully compatible with Nikon SLRs that deployed with 3D Matrix Metering System. To say the least, it was also for the first time that we witnessed Nikon used their ED glass element in an economical-class autofocus telephoto zoom lens. So, I guess very few Nikon photographers would complain on the spec sheet alone. Well, Nikon thought so and in fact, they produced an alternate AF Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G Tele-Zoom lens almost at the same time in 1998 and the AF-G lens was offered with a choice of either in black or silvery gray outfit. However, to ensure the sales of the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED picked up, BOTH the G-spec Tele-Zoom lenses were NOT employed with an ED glass in its optical group. This has made the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED packaged in a more appealing factor for consumers in the market.

The major highlight of this Nikkor tele-zoom is, it offers a series of convenient telephoto focal lengths from 70mm through 300mm. It provides full AF (autofocus) and manual focus operation and fully functional with virtually all classes of Nikon AF/MF cameras (except for the Nikon F3AF and non Ai-spec Nikon bodies). To some who may be technology orientated, distance information is automatically transferred to any 3D Matrix Meter enabled Nikon SLR camera model. Optically, it has a 13 elements in 9 groups optical design and uses Nikon's Extra-low Dispersion (ED) glass element (10th element), and assume to be providing outstanding image quality and minimizes effect of chromatic aberration at the longer focal length section. As noted earlier, it was considered as a rare treat for consumers as not many Nikon telephoto zoom lens were packaged in such an affordable manner.

Credit: Image courtesy of shutterblade*com where the Company has a website on its own. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.

Similar to the earlier AF Zoom-Nikkor 75-300mm f/4.5~5.6S, this ED Nikkor zoom lens also has a variable aperture design so as to keep the lens dimension down. Zooming the lens from 70 mm to 300 mm decreases the maximum aperture approx. 1 f/stop. It still has a 62mm filter attachment size and close focuses down to approx. 1.5m (4.9') but Nikon has eliminated the MACRO FOCUS feature but even then, the lens can still deliver an impressive magnification ratio of approx. 1/3.9 - which is good enough for most general requirement. The lens basically uses a dual rings rotating zoom design. The center section of the zoom is an extra wide zoom ring is is very comfortable to hold and grip for control zooming action. To zoom in and out, you can just simply turn the zoom ring until the desired composition reflects in the viewfinder. Yes. The lens was primarily being designed as an Autofocus zoom where manual focus is secondary so, it does not has a distance scale window for you to refer. Similarly, manual focusing has to be confirmed through the finder. The outer ring with a narrower grip is for manual focus control, it may not be the world's best designed in this area but Nikon purely aimed its target users at owners of Nikon autofocus cameras. For manual focus Nikon users who may find this AF Nikkor tele zoom lens useful, they just have to live with this inconvenience. But come to think of it, at times, even AF photographers may also require to revert to manual focusing, this could has been improved and I guess it does not cost much to do so, right ? Anyway, this manual focusing ring in this this AF-D Nikkor zoom lens can be considered as one tiny flaw in its overall good lens design.

Portrait of a kid in bath by ShakeelAhmad < www.pbase.com/laserays


<<<-- A 70-300mm covers most of the focal length traditionally photographers use for portraiture. The maximum aperture may not be large enough to throw blur on the background, but adequate for most portraiture on mid apertures as long as background is taken care of.

Credit: Image courtesy of Shakeel Ahmad, who maintains his online PORTFOLIO at PBASE. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

On lens handling and other issues, the projected viewfinder image is not considerably bright as you thought its should be. This is less significant as it auto focuses itself but may pose a little issue for manual focusing in dimly lit area. The main issue is the less desirable maximum lens speed. At less favorable light level, at f/4 at its shortest and f/5.6 at its longest end of the focal length, it may require use of faster film type to compensate or to extend depth of field usage. The lens actually extends physically while focuses and zooming. Although not a big issue but you may have to reset the filter attachment after desired focus has been achieved. For a zoom lens, it has a rather unusual inclusion of a minimum f-stop of f/32, probably it is of good use for attaining gain maximum depth of field in situations such as when close focus operation; combining the perspective compression nature at the longer focal length for other creative application etc. The standard accessories supplied includes a bayonet hard plastic lens hood, HB-15. The hood extension was quite far out and it should be a handy when shooting in backlit scenes.

This AF-D Nikkor tele-zoom lens has a very inviting appearance. Especially with the golden lens designation that sits above the aperture ring. It depicts the use of Nikon ED glass element inside the optical design. But it is very light where you thought it should be heavier, One way or another it lacks the rigid and solid feel as compared to the earlier AF Zoom-Nikkor 75-300mm f/4.5~5.6S. Well, for those who like it may term this as its strength. The rear lens metal mount was where all the various pins, encoders and levers located. Basically, all these have made this AF-D Nikkor tele-zoom lens also with an Ai-S basic spec and you can literally use it with virtually any MF Nikon SLR bodies with a minimum Ai-spec for full scale operation. Optically, for those who have high expectation of a ED glass powered Nikkor lens may have mixed feeling. Although I would not like to influence any buying decision but all I can comment is, I do missed my trusty Nikkor 180mm f/2.8S ED lens where I am more contented with. However, as question of whether is it a good or so-so optic involves individual interpretation but purely from the perspective of spec sheet alone, this lens possesses all the good elements within to term it as a good tele-zoom lens. I do like the versatility as well a practical aspect of its zoom ratio provides. A tele zoom lenses can be used for a wide scope of photographic applications such as traveling, in/outdoor portraiture, streets candid, documentary, scenic, nature, outdoor sport events and other general photography. So, while it covers the longer section of focal lengths, this may present itself as a very good consideration to be a companion zoom to supplement another wide-tele zoom lens such as 24-xxx or 28-105mm or simply with a compact prime wideangle lens.



Nikon AF Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.0~5.6G telephoto zoom lens
Introduced: 2000; Discontinued: current version (as at 2006).

Strangely, two years later after the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED was released, Nikon has quietly announced an alternative in an aperture-ringless for this immensely popular telephoto zoom. The AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G has no ED glass. This was probably the the first AF Nikkor lens that has the aperture ring removed. It was supplied in two configurations / exterior finishes but unlike the AF-D counterpart featured earlier, BOTH of these two variations have a NON-ED configuration inside. Specifically designed for the newer Nikon AF SLR camera bodies that use sub command input dial system and Nikon sees no necessity to include an aperture ring for this lens and hence, it was eliminated. So, for MANUAL FOCUS NIKON USERS, be aware, this lens may post some problems which involves manipulation of aperture as there is none fro you to do so. With the G-type Nikkor lens, the aperture should be selected on the camera body via the sub command dial for Aperture-Priority AE and Manual Exposure modes. Some of the compatible Nikon bodies are Nikon F6, F5, F100, Nikon F80, F65, F60, F50, F-401-series, PRONEA 600i, PRONEA S and virtually ALL Nikon Digital SLR models. For the Nikon F4, F90-series, F70, F-801-series and F-601M cameras, only Programmed AE or Shutter-Priority auto exposure mode can be used. IN SHORT, the lens is not compatible with other Nikon SLR cameras. With a compatible Nikon SLR camera, a G-type Nikkor lens does offers easier, mistake-free setup since the aperture does not need to be set to its minimum aperture. Further, as virtually ALL G-series AF Nikkor lenses are genetically classified as AF-D, so distance Information is transmitted to camera body electronically for Nikon SLR cameras that enable 3D Matrix Metering for a more precise metering readings and exposure control for ambient and TTL flash.

Super battleship Carrier Kitty Hawk by James Laurence Clarke, Australia
Credit: Image courtesy of Miljenko Devãiç from Zagreb
Croatia,
who maintains his PORTFOLIO at PBASE. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Although both these AF Nikkor Zoom 70-300 lenses have a similar zoom ratio, the golden ED lens data plate found on the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED was missing in the AF-G version. Other spec remains identical but the price was much cheaper than the ED version. Nikon has also designed a dedicated lens hood HB-26 for this AF-G 70-300 tele-zoom which can be store inversely onto lens). Despite all the effort to cut corners, Nikon has not been able to trim the overall dimension down and so, it still has a 62mm filter attachment size. But on the other hand, the lens has a 9-blades rounded diaphragm within to render more natural out-of-focus blur. Further, the lens coating of this AF-G has been updated with Nikon Super Integrated Coating (SIC) to minimize flare and ghost and ensuring high contrast images shooting at scenes like backlit as well as maintaining a more neutral colour balance.

Nikon AF zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G tele-zoom by digitizeed future

Nikon AF zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G tele-zoom dual finishes

One of the easiest visual reference to differentiate the G-lens from other AF Nikkor lenses is - Firstly, there is NO aperture ring in this version. Actually, MOST of the entry level G-spec lenses usually carry a black all plastic lens mount at the back (as with this version); it also provides a much narrower, all plastic manual focusing ring at the front end; next Lastly, the lens data was printed as AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G. NOTE:- The AF-G 70/300 magnifies itself on any DX format Nikon Digital SLR camera as a 105mm~450mm zoom due to crop factor.

A mini photo showcase of the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G telephoto zoom lens that was made in China:-

Credit: All images courtesy of Digitize Future@EBAY®. who operates their online EBAY STORE. Image(s) copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Click on thumbnail(s) for Explosive View(s)

Vertical view with lens hood HB-26 stored inversely Front view ith lens cap Lens hood on AF zoom 70-300mm G Basic lens of AF Nikkor 70-300mm G zoom Lens extension for AF Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6G telephoto zoom

Due to its modest price tag, this AF-G 70/300mm tele-zoom lens was quite popular as first time buyer of a Nikon Digital SLR usually put priority on overall pricing for their first package. Provided your Nikon is a version that has Sub-Command Dial and if price is your primary consideration in deciding which version to choose from, this AF-G lens does offered as an alternative to the AF-D ED tele-zoom lens we discussed earlier. However, if seriously price is ENTIRELY a decisive factor - you do have other option as a year later in 1999 after debut of the AF-G zoom lens; Nikon has also released another AF zoom Nikkor 75-240mm f/4~5.6D which has a compromised zoom ratio but shares almost the same appearance and feel with this AF-G 70-300mm Nikkor zoom. Due to the "compromises" the 75-240mm tele-zoom lens has smaller 52mm filter diameter where it makes purchases of standard filter accessories even cheaper. But it was phased out quickly as seemingly the duplication of focal length on these two lenses has made photographers more favoring to the ED glass 70-300mm.

Rear plastic lens mount of a entry level G-spec AF Nikkor lens
Lastly, some web resources are very determined to relate this tele-zoom were not produce of Nikon at all. According to say, Ken Rockwell - he thinks it was produced by Tamron on contract fro Nikon. I have no clues to this not wish to find out more truth in it, so, I will just leave that to you to find out. (Technical Specification for this version is available at the bottom - shared with AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED) . Lastly, please take note, the G-Spec Zoom has no aperture ring, similarly, it has no aperture direct readout (ADR) scales and no meter coupling prong neither.

<<<--- The harden plastic rear lens mount of a typical entry level G-spec AF Nikkor lens.


Nikon AF zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G tele-zoom by digitizeed future Silver finishing Front lens element of AF Nikkor zoom 70-300mm G silver finishing on lens extension

AF Nikkor zoom 70-300mm G silver finishing on lens extension AF Nikkor zoom 70-300mm G silver finishing on lens extension

Click on thumbnail(s) for Explosive View(s) for this silvery /gray version of the AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4!5.6D Telephoto Zoom lens.

basic lens dimension on AF Nikkor zoom 70-300mm G silver finishing on lens extension Lens data made in China on AF Nikkor zoom 70-300mm G

Super battleship Carrier Kitty Hawk by James Laurence Clarke, Australia
The long reach of a 300mm permits capturing of a distant subject. Well illustrated by this awesome nuclear powered US Battleship carrier which may be military restricted for public entry.

Credit: Image courtesy of James Laurence Clarke, who maintains his online PORTFOLIO at PBASE. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Depth of field scales reference chart
Although it varies from individual to individual, but there are a few shortcomings which I think you should know. Firstly, there is no depth of field scales offering as a basic guide. Next, even the infra index(es) have been removed making it difficult for those who often like to shoot infra-photography.

Similar to the high end spec
AF Nikkor Zoom 20-35mm f/2.8D IF - Nikon has not even bother to provide marked Depth of Field Scales on this lens. Instead, it only only being supplied inside the instruction manual in a form of printed material. @#$$@^# just how the hell you expect someone to carry an instruction manual all the time whenever needed to 'trace" the respective depth of field in relation to focal length set ? Technically, it can be simply imprinted onto lens but probably Nikon thought it can save a few bucks and lay off some workers who do the painted works..So, I guess these bloody guys at Nikon were making assumption since it is an entry level zoom lens, perhaps a new kid in town would not understand what is depth of field or infra index, so why bother supply these features, huh ?


Anyway, below I have replicated the printed DOF for you as a source of reference as probably one day you might have to use it.

The variable aperture on this lens: Zooming the lens from 70 mm to 300 mm decreases the maximum aperture approx. 1 f/stop. For cameras with TTL metering, there is no need to adjust the aperture. Likewise, for TTL automatic flash photography with Nikon Speedlights, no adjustment is required. However, when the flash-to-subject distance approaches either the near or far limit of the automatic shooting range, the aperture may need to be adjusted slightly. When using a separate exposure meter or taking photographs in the non-TTL flash mode, select the appropriate aperture index according to the focal length setting in the following way (see below *): The green aperture index is used for the 70 mm focal length setting and the yellow one for the 300 mm setting. Click stops are provided at the green aperture index with each aperture setting.

Variable aperture of Nikko AF zoom lens
For zoom settings between 70 and 300 mm, align the aperture ring between the two indexes to obtain the best possible overall exposure.

Illus A 300mm

Illus A 135mm

Illus A 70mm

Variable aperture/two Aperture Indexes

300mm

135mm

70mm

Zoom extension
The Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED DOES NOT has an IF design. The lens extension will physically extends while it focuses. NEXT, neither the filter ring is fixed. It rotates along, so, be careful when used special filter accessories.

Zebra by Zebra EricBabineau from Canada


<<<-- From close-up to distant scenic. versatility of a tele-zoom can be of good use for a wide variety of subjects in personal photography.

Credit: Image courtesy of ERIC Babineau from Cananda, who maintains his online PORTFOLIO at PBASE. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Technical Specification for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED / Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G tele-zoom lens:-

Type of lens: D-type AF Zoom-Nikkor lens with built-in CPU and Nikon bayonet mount.
Focal length:
70 -300mm f/4 -f/5.6
Maximum aperture
: f/4.0 at widest angle, f/5.6 towards 300mm
Lens construction:
13 elements in 9 groups (
* Inclusive of 1xED glass element for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED)
Picture angle: 34° 20' to 8° 10' (27° 40' to 6° 40' with IX240 system cameras; 22°50' - 5°20' with Nikon digital cameras (Nikon DX format)
Focal length scale:
70, 100, 135, 200 and 300 mm
Distance scale:
Graduated in meters and feet from 1.5m (5 ft) to infinity (OO)
Distance information
: Output into camera body with CPU interface system
IS POSSIBLE with both lenses; Option for manual focus provided
Focus/zoom control:
Via two independent control rings (Focus control: Via focusing ring (Zoom control: Via zoom ring)

Nikon HB-26 lens hood for AF Nikkor Zoom 70-300mm f/4~5.6G telephoto zoom lens

Nikon HB-15 lens hood for the AF-Tele-Zoom as well as on lens extension and basic setup of standard package.

Credit: Image at far left courtesy of WiBiSTiX@EBAY® where the Company also operates a website (URL:www.valleycameras.co.uk). Image at left Credit: Image courtesy of Shutterblade Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.

Depth of Field Scales: NONE
Minimum aperture lock
: Provided via slide switch;
* None for G-spec lens
Zoom Control:
Manual, via separate zoom ring
Aperture scale:
f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22 and f/32
Lens Coating
: SIC (Nikon Super Integrated lens Coating)
Diaphragm:
Fully automatic (
* minimum aperture [f32] can be locked - ED version only);
Number of diaphragm blades
: 9; Infrared compensation scale: NONE
Credit: Image courtesy of shutterblade*com where the Company has a website on its own. Image copyright © 2003. All rights reserved.
Exposure measurement: Via full-aperture method with Ai cameras or cameras with CPU interface system; via stop-down method for other cameras (* NOT applicable for G-spec version of the Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G
Attachment size: 62 mm (P=0.75 mm)
Dimensions:
Approx. 74 mm dia. x 116 mm extension from the camera's lens mounting flange; overall length is approx. 125 mm
Weight:
Approx. 515g (18.2 oz)
Standard Accessories: 62 mm Snap-On, front and Rear lens caps, Bayonet hood HB-15 (
* Original hood, HB-26 for the Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G)

MTF graph for AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm ED zoom lens at Wideangle setting
Wide
MTF graph for AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm ED zoom lens at telephoto setting
Tele

Nomencluture of Nikon AF zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED tele-zoom

Optional accessories: Hard lens case CL-72, 62 mm screw-in filters, TC-201S; TC-14AS (* NOTE: MANUAL focus only - not applicable to the G-spec version).

Optical contruction for Nikon AF 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED tele photo zoom
NOTE: External front filter attachment frame is Rotatable. Circular polarizing filter is usable but filter frame rotates according to lensí AF operation. Circular polarizing filter II is also usable, even with dedicated Lens Hood HB-15 but filter frame rotates according to lensí AF operation. AF-3:-usable. (3); AF-4:- Usable. (5): Indicates maximum number of usable hoods (HN-36 for AF-3/HN-37 for AF-4). <<< -- Shown is the optical group used for ED and standard G-spec version.

Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED with Nikon FM2N Top view, of  Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED with Nikon FM2N

Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED with NikonF5

Some views of the lens taken with various Nikon SLRs while still was in my possession. Nikon FM2N and Nikon F5.

Others:-
Be careful not to spoil or damage the CPU contacts. Do not attach the following accessories to the lens, as they might damage the lens CPU contacts Auto Extension PK-1, Ring PK-11 (use PK-11A), K1 Ring or Auto Ring BR-4 (use BR-5 with BR-2A). Other accessories may not be suitable when this lens is used with certain camera bodies. For details, refer to instruction manual for each product. This lens will not provide autofocus operation when used with a Nikon F3AF camera with the AF Finder DX-1 attached.

Startup Serial Number for the Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED lens may have been began from: 200001 < 208395 - 586855 > Mar 1998; Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G in plastic mount, 70-300 without ED 2000001 < 2027801 - 2388462 > Aug00 - 13/9; AF 70-300/4-5.6 G high serial nos 3+ 9000001 < 9001671 - 9209087 > > 2005 - Reference: Roland Vink's lens data sheet.

Recommended focusing screens

Various interchangeable focusing screens are available for certain Nikon SLR cameras to suit any picture-taking situation. The ones recommended for use with this lens are listed in the table below:- (Reference point:- ED version with most Nikon SLRs)

Model/Screens

EC-B

A/L

B

C

D

E

G1

G2

G3

G4

H1

H2

H3

H4

J

K

P

M

S

T

U

F

F5 + DP-30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F5 + DA-30

.

(+0.5)

.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F4+DP-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F4 + DA-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FE, FE2, FM2, FM2n, FA, F2A and F2AS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


.

Excellent focusing

.

Acceptable focusing; Slight vignetting or moire phenomenon affects screen image, but film image shows no traces of these.

.

Split image rangefinder, microprism or cross hair area might be dim or hard to focus. But you can use the surrounding matte area for focusing or composing.

.

Not Applicable with screen type. Type M can be used for both macrophotography at 1:1 reproduction ratio and for photomicroraphy. It has different application than other screens. Type K (K2), E (E2) and B (B2) for FM2, FM2n (And other FM2 series models); FE, FA and FE2, refer to this section for more info on compatibility issue on exposure compensation.

(+-)

Indicates degree of exposure compensation needed for F5-series or F4-series cameras (Center-Weighted metering only). For F5 camera, compensate using the Custom Setting #18 on the camera body. See instruction manual of the camera body for more details. For F4-series cameras, compensate using the Exposure Compensation Dial for the focusing screen. (See the F4/F4s instruction manual, page 78).



Nikon AF Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5~5.6D telephoto zoom lens
Introduced: June, 1999; Discontinued: 2001

This lens was possibly be one of the shortest lived AF Nikkor tele-zoom lens around. Made in China and probably designed specifically for some third world economies to aid entry levels Nikon SLRs. One way or another, probably it was also aimed to make Nikon products more appealing to cost conscious consumers. It is NOT a G-spec lens but shares similarities of a cheap, entry G-spec Nikkor. IF I have a choice, I would rather not wasting time featuring it but it was here because I am trying to compile information reference on possibly all available AF Nikkor lenses, that is all. Sound harsh ? Yeap. I think Nikon felt it too in lackluster commercial performance too as nowadays, consumers are equally getting smart too. This AF Nikkor tele-zoom lens has a rather odd zoom range with focal length of 75mm to 240mm which is a "new creation" of this zoom range. The change also affects the marked focal length scales on the zoom ring which were printed horizontally around the edge of the zoom ring as 75, 85, 105, 135, 200 and 300 mm. I am not sure if it has replicated in another finishes as with the earlier AF-G options for black or silver but I would assume it was only supplied in all matte-black finish. Similarly, the zoom lens has an all black plastic lens mount at the rear.

AF-Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5-5.6D zoom lens
It is a rotating zoom with two separate rings for zooming control and manual focusing. It was a very lightweight zoom lens and when I termed it as "entry level" it also reflects in its economical retail price when it was marketed. It does has a few good points in its modest entry price which makes the financially less fortunate folks to own a tele-zoom lens with an original "Nikkor" name tag. It has reasonably good zoom ratio and variable tele focal lengths. Nikon has managed to screeze something out from reduction of its zoom ratio + maximum lens speed by enabling the lens to use cheaper standard 52mm filter accessories. Despite labeling it as a cheap entry level zoom, the lens still features a 7 leafs diaphragm which according to Nikon, it helps to "soften aberrations and distortion at the edge of the images...".

<<<--To me, good news is - it still has an aperture ring.

It is a AF-D spec AF Nikkor tele zoom lens, meaning it has a wide system compatibility with many autofocus film/digital based Nikon SLR cameras introduced thus far. Similarly, older MF Nikon users may also be enjoying some benefits as it carries all the basic essentials of an Ai-S lens spec. Besides, the manual focusing ring is far more wider than the comparing AF-D/G 70-300mm counterparts. The minimum aperture stops down to f/32 which is good for extended depth of field control. Its closest focusing distance is at 1.5m but boosting an impressive magnification ratio of 1/1.5. Not bad with such a zoom, huh ? With a DX format Nikon D-SLR, the focal length is magnified as approx. 112~360mm. The lens hood, if I am not wrong is the hard plastic HB-21 (as Most Nikon official sites never listed this lens in their product range - even the "Comprehensive Archived Products" section at the Nikon Japan official site. Sad..

AF-Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5-5.6D zoom lens vertical view
NOTE: Similar to the 70-300mm class of AF Nikkor telephoto-zoom options we discussed earlier. The front filter attachment frame for this lens is also rotatable. Circular polarizing filter is usable but filter frame rotates according to lensí AF operation. Further, for those MF Nikon users (esp. the Ai-Nikon F2, Nikon F3 Series, Nikkormat, Nikon FM2N or FE series users) who may be using the split image rangefinder, the dim f/4.5 maximum aperture can be very unfriendly for focusing and photo composition, you may revert to use the type B or E screen to avoid darkening split image rangefinder of Standard type K screen. Overall, this may not be a professional grade zoom lens, but if you just wanted an affordable telephoto zoom for casual photography and for light traveling companion to a wideangle zoom, forget of what I have commented earlier where this lens may still deliver and meet such an objective - after all, lenses are getting more and more expensive and not everyone is interested to magnify the captured to see if the corner resolution in the image worthy an investment, right ?

Technical Specification for Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5~5.6D telephoto-zoom lens:-

Type of lens: D-type AF Zoom-Nikkor lens with built-in CPU and Nikon bayonet mount.
Focal length:
75 -240mm f/4.5 -f/5.6
Maximum aperture
: f/4.5 at widest angle, f/5.6 towards 300mm
Lens construction:
12 elements in 9 groups

Mt Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota by Fred Henstridge
Mt Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota

Credit: Image courtesy of Fred Henstridge® from US, who maintains her PORTFOLIO at Pbase. Image copyright © 2006. All rights reserved. Please respect the visual property of the contributing photographer.

Picture angle: 31° 40' to 10° 20' (27° 40' to 6° 40' with IX240 system cameras; 22°50' - 5°20' with Nikon digital cameras (Nikon DX format)
Focal length scales:
75, 85, 105, 135, 200 and 300 mm
Distance scale:
Graduated in meters and feet from 1.5m (5 ft) to infinity (OO)
Distance information
: Output into camera body with CPU interface system
IS POSSIBLE with both lenses; Option for manual focus provided
Focus/zoom control:
Via two independent control rings (Focus control: Via focusing ring (Zoom control: Via zoom ring)

Optical composition for AF Nikkor 75-240mm zoom
Depth of Field Scales: NONE
Minimum aperture lock
: Provided via slide switch
Zoom Control:
Manual, via separate zoom ring
Aperture scale:
f/4.5/f/5.6, f/8.0, f/11, f/16, f/22 and f/32 (orange)

Lens Coating: SIC (Nikon Super Integrated lens Coating)
Diaphragm:
Fully automatic (minimum aperture [f32] can be locked);
Number of diaphragm blades: 7; Infrared compensation scale: none
Exposure measurement: Via full-aperture method with Al cameras or cameras with CPU interface system; via stop-down method for other cameras
Attachment size: 52 mm (P=0.75 mm)
Dimensions: Approx. 71 mm dia. x 121 mm; Weight: Approx. 396g
Standard Accessories: 52 mm snap-on, front and Rear lens caps, Bayonet hood HB-21
Optional accessories: 52 mm screw-in filters,
TC-201S; TC-14AS (note: MANUAL focus only)., Hard lens case CL-72 should be usable

Others:- This lens will not provide autofocus operation when used with a Nikon F3AF camera with the AF Finder DX-1 attached.

Startup Serial Number for the Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5~5.6D tele-zoom lens may have been began from: 200001 < 241733 - 285362 > June 1999- 12.9 2000 - Reference: Roland Vink's lens data sheet.

previous | NEXT | 2/3 Nikon AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5~5.6G and AF-S VR Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G IF-ED Telephoto Zoom lens

AF Zoom Nikkor 75-300mm f/4.5~5.6S / AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6D ED / AF Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G / AF Zoom Nikkor 75-240mm f/4.5~5.6D / AFS VR Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4~5.6G IF-ED | RELATIVE:- AF Zoom Nikkor 70-210mm lens group | AF Zoom Nikkor 80-200mm lens group

Main Index Page - Autofocus Nikkor lenses

| Message Board | for your Nikkor Optics in a shared environment
| Message Board | Specifically for Dispose or Looking for new/used Nikon/Nikkor photographic equipment

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Nikon MF RF-Nikkor lenses for Rangefinder cameras:- Main Index Page
Nikon Auto Focus Nikkor lenses:- Main Index Page
Nikon Manual Focus Nikkor lenses:-
Fisheye-Nikkor Lenses - Circular | Full Frame | Ultrawides Lenses - 13mm15mm18mm20mm | Wideangle Lenses - 24mm28mm35mm | Standard Lenses - 45mm 50mm 58mm | Telephoto Lenses - 85mm105mm135mm180mm & 200mm | Super-Telephoto Lenses - 300mm 400mm 500mm 600mm 800mm 1200mm |

Nikkor Link.jpg   Special Application lenses:
Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
Reflex-Nikkor Lenses - 500mm 1000mm 2000mm
Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

Tele-Converters: TC-1 | TC-2 | TC-200 | TC-201 | TC-300 | TC-301 | TC-14 | TC-14A | TC-14B | TC-14C | TC-14E | TC-16 | TC-16A | TC-20E

Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-153.html by: my friend, Rick Oleson
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

Recommended Reading Reference on Nikon cameras and Nikkor lenses | about this photographic web site

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Credit: To all the good people who has contributed their own experience, resources or those who are kind enough granting us permission to use their images appeared in this site Note:certain content and images appeared in this site were either scanned from official marketing leaflets, brochures, sales manuals or publications published by Nikon over the years and/or contribution from surfers who claimed originality of their work for educational purposes. The creator of the site will not be responsible for may discrepancies arise from such dispute except rectifying them after verification."Nikon", "Nikkormat", "Nippon Kokagu KK" & "Nikkor" are registered tradename of Nikon Corporation Inc., Japan. Site made with an Apple IMac.