Modern Classic SLRs Series :
Nikon F & F2 Shared Resources: Flash Power Sources

 

* New updates on battery

LA-1 AC Unit

Presumably, this unit receives mains power (as with most Nikon AC units, input voltage is switcheable between 110, 117, 220, and 240V) and supplies power to the built-in ringlight of the Medical-Nikkor. Recycling time will be appox. 8 sec. (full) or 5 sec. (1/4 power). This is the appropriate unit for the later Medical-Nikkor, which has a three-pin power socket. It has two switches on the control panel, one for power on-off and the other for supplied power full-1/4.

This is also the appropriate unit for the SR-2 and SM-2 ringlights.

LD-1 DC Unit

This unit derives its power from eight "D"-type 1.5V batteries. It supplies power to the built-in ringlight of the (later) Medical-Nikkor. It has two switches on the control panel, one for power on-off and the other for supplied power full-1/4. With fresh alkaline cells, it will provide 600 full or 1 400 1/4 power flashes, recycling at 9 sec. (full) or 4 sec. (1/4 power).

This is also the appropriate unit for the SR-2 and SM-2 ringlights.

Medical-Nikkor AC Unit (original)

Presumably, this unit receives mains power (as with most Nikon AC units, input voltage is switcheable between 110, 117, 220, and 240V) and supplies power to the built-in ringlight of the Medical-Nikkor. Recycling time will be appox. 8 sec. (full) or 5 sec. (1/4 power). This is the appropriate unit for the earlier Medical-Nikkor, which has a four-pin power socket. It has two switches on the control panel, one for power on-off and the other for supplied power full-1/4.

Medical-Nikkor DC Unit (original)

This unit derives its power from four "D"-type 1.5V and one 240V battery (Energizer 4912). It supplies power to the built-in ringlight of the (early) Medical-Nikkor. It has two switches on the control panel, one for power on-off and the other for supplied power full-1/4.

SA-1 AC Unit/Charger

The SA-1 is officially known as the AC Unit/Charger SA-1, and is designed for use with the SB-1. It has a switch to change the input voltage from 100, 117, 220, and 240V AC, and takes standard mains current. It is a "brick" with two cords, one for the mains supply, and the other a four-socket connector for the SB-1.
Not only does it serve as a power supply to the SB-1, it also recharges the (low-capacity) SN-1 NiCad slowly: a full charge (providing 80 flashes with the SN-1) takes 14-16 hours. However, you are cautioned to remove the SN-1 if you will be using the SA-1 as your main power supply. Recycling time is approximately 4 seconds.

SA-2 AC Unit

The SA-2 is the proper AC adapter for the SB-2/3 and outputs 300V, 23mA DC. The input is taken from standard house current, and is switcheable between 100, 117, 220, and 240V AC. It consists of a fairly small "brick" to which two cords are attached: one connects to the speedlite and the other connects to an AC socket. The AC input selector is on the brick. The recycling time is approximately the same as if you used batteries: approximately 8 seconds on manual and less than 1 second in automatic, with a distance of 2m at f/5.6.

To use the SA-2: set the proper AC input voltage on the SA-2 "brick"
turn the SB-2/3 off connect the speedlite to the brick connect the brick to the AC source; at this point, the unit should charge and be ready for action in 8 sec.

SA-3 AC Unit

This is the AC mains adapter for the SB-6 Repeating Flash. From a small, grainy picture, I can discern an on/off slider, a pilot light (to indicate power), two sockets for power connections, and little else.

SD-1 Battery Pack

No known data. Perhaps an early SB-1 power pack? Did it even exist?

SD-2 D-Cell Pack

The SD-2 is a portable battery pack that provides up to 1 000 flashes when filled with six 1.5 D-type alkaline batteries. It is designed for the SB-1 and plugs into the same square four-pin port as the SA-1. It has a power switch which overrides the one on the back of the SB-1's flash head (which should be turned off when using the SD-2). The recycling time varies between 3.5 to 6 seconds (from fresh alkalines to depleted high-rate manganese batteries).

SD-3 510-Volt Battery Pack

The SD-3 is a portable battery pack that provides up to 700 flashes when filled with one 510V (Energizer 497) and four 1.5 AA-type batteries. It is designed for the SB-1 and plugs into the ringlight port (so you can't use the SM-1/SR-1 at the same time as the SD-3). It has a power switch which overrides the one on the back of the SB-1's flash head (which should be turned off when using the SD-3). Recycling time is the fastest of all SB-1 power sources at 1.5 seconds.

SD-4 Battery Pack

The SD-4 provides dramatically longer endurance and shorter recycling for the SB-5. You put either two 240V (0160 type, Energizer 4912, same as the original Medical-Nikkor DC unit) or one 480V (0160W type) laminated battery into it and hook it up. Recycling time ranges from 0.25 to 1.5 sec., depending on the mode in use.

SD-5 DC Unit

The SD-5 makes the SB-6 somewhat mobile. You load it up with eight rechargeable SN-3's and just walk out ... I have no data on the SD-5.

Additional info provided by Don Walsh from Thailand"....I am negotiating to buy a Nikon SB-5 speedlight with SH-2 quick charger, SU-1, and SK-3. However there is no SN-2 nicad (live or dead) with the set.

Previously I have had good luck in researching and rebuilding or having custom battery firms produce to order, obsolete Nikon batteries, specifically MN-1 and DN-1 -- both of which I use now in NiMH rather than NiCd.

Unfortunately it seems like in case of SN-2 this task isn't going to be as simple. I have scant information about the battery, what I have comes from Michael Liu's website. It states that SN-2 is similar to nicad cluster for Metz 45 CT series...I was wondering if I could obtain references to source material or if you might be able to assist in locating a dead specimen of SN-2? Even the mere loan of one would be invaluable. I tried to contact Michael Liu at mliu@mit.edu but it bounced back, I assume because he has graduated.

Here is what I can say with some certainty, based on examination of quick charger and handlemount:

SN-2 is approximately 32mm diameter x 115-120mm long.
Both contacts are on top end.
Voltage is 14.4, mAh is c.800 mAh.

The voltage/current capacity is deduced from charger output which is 16.4V 200 mA DC. Chargers always output more than nominal battery voltage, for example the MH-1 outputs 8.2V 70 mA to charge the 7.2V MN-1 in approx 4.5 to 5 hours, the MN-1 is a 280 mAh battery, and so MH-1 is by definition a C/4 quick charger.

The SN-2 is twice the voltage of a MH-1 (and therefore same as 2 MN-1 in series, or same as total voltage of a MB-1 with nicads.) Therefore since ALL nicad primary cells are 1.2V this is a 12 cell battery with cells in series. Voltage is additive in series, capacity is not -- SN-2's capacity is c.4X200 mA or 800 mAh. The primary cells making up SN-2 MUST each be a 800 mAh cell, which is a potent battery to pack into no more than 1/12th of the space of slightly less than 2 D-cells in height and diameter.

If a D-diameter button cell of 9.5mm height exists, this could be a simple 12-stack of such cells strapped together and heat-shrink-wrapped, or encased in a plastic tube with a terminal on the end wired to the poles.

HOWEVER if it is like a Metz-45 nicad as you suggest then it must be something like three 4-stacks of 2/3AA primary cells, all in series, and bundled in a triangular array (one stack being 'upside down'). 3 AA diameter cells cluster together perfectly nested in a 35mm film can which is just slightly less than D cell diameter and which is therefore just right to fit into SB-5 handle.

Current nicad 2/3AA cells are 400 mAh, NiMH are 600 mAh, which is lower than expected 800 mAh -- unless Nikon shifted to a C/2 quick charger design which is a rather 'hot' nicad charging methodology, unless it is a 'smart' enough charger to incorporate thermocouple or delta-V cutoff. Otherwise overheating will damage the batteries.

The SH-2 holds 2 SN-2 by the way.

I would be happy to provide technical information and photos to your and Michael's resources sites once this project is completed; I am also seeking SD-4 battery pack and the massive laminated 4912 battery. (I own a Medical Nikkor type 1 DC supply...part of a complete set).
Any assistance you could provide would be much appreciated."


Thanks in advance

Don Walsh
Bangkok, Thailand

More updates...from Don Walsh, Thailand.

"... SN-2: Voltage, dimensions and number of cells information is correct. However, I was wrong about 3x4 array of 2/3AA cells. In fact SN-2 is 6x2 circular aray of AAA cells. The similarity to Metz 45 nicad cluster, which is a larger 5x1 D-shaped cluster of AA cells, is rather limited. Both have skeletonized plastic shells, that is about the extent of it.

Now that construction is known with certainty, capacity is in some doubt. AAA nicads have no more than 250 mAh capacity. This makes the 200 mA output of the SH-2 quick charger rather surprising unless it is a C/1 VERY quick charger. The capacity might be increased by substituting AAA or 5/4AAA NiMH cells, which gets the capacity up to 550-650 mAh, but such cells weren't available commercially at the time of the SB-5 and SN-2's production. At least I think not!

As I still lack an actual SN-2 specimen, the final design questions have to do with the connector, and presumably there is some feature incorporated to make reverse insertion impossible (both poles are on top, like a MN-1, but connector ought to be asstmetrical to preclude reverse polarity.) These issues will be resolved as soon as I receive SH-2 and SB-5, which are on the way to me now. I have a custom battery assembler standing by to fabricate SN-2 replacement and will furnish photos as soon as available.
Yuasa.jpg
A battery found in SB-1 handle. It is a Yuasa (Japan) product and is simple stack of 6 flared button cells, nicad chemistry, 7.2V 500 mAh capacity. Dimensions are 35x63.5mm. That is slightly wider and longer than a 'D' cell. The cells were long obsolete Yuasa 500fz and are same as now discontinued Varta V500RF and V500H types. No indication of tapering as described in Michael's text. Battery could be inserted backwards easily (NOT advisable!). I have succesfully sourced replacement cells and batteries, with a great deal of difficulty. However I am still uncertain whether or not this is actually identical to SN-1, as there is no Nikon marking anywhere. Nikon conspicuously 'branded' its other early nicads such as DN-1 and MN-1. Incidentally, MN-1's internal Nicad battery was produced by a (now defunct?) US firm, Yardley, in New England. The cells for custom assembly of this battery to rebuild old dead MN-1's are quite easily obtained. They are 26x8-9mm 1.2V buttons made in NiCd and NiMH, capacity 270 to 300 mAh. A stack of 6 strapped together and heatshrink wrapped, and with nickel solder tabs spotwel ded to the ends, is ready to be soldered to the leads to MN-1's connectors. Get the polarity correct, of course.


3. One of my colleagues has come into possession of original SK-1 bracket for SB-1 (not for sale, sorry.) So I can now confirm existance of this early bracket, and tell you that main difference between it and more common SK-2 is that SK-1 has no provision for mounting F with F36 or F2 with MD-1/MD-2/MD-3. So SK-1 apparently predates Cordless Pack.

4. As I now have both SB-7E and battery pack MB-2, I can assure you that Michael is quite correct to have doubts about Moose Peterson's assertion that MS-2 AA clip for MB-2 is same as AA clip (which may have same nomenclature) for SB-7E/8E. These are NOT interchangeable. Users sourcing replacement MS-2 clips for MB-2 are therefore cautioned against buying AA-clips such as Wall Street Camera offers, described as for the SB-7E ..."


SN-1 NC Battery

The SN-1 is the only battery that fits into the handle of the SB-1, providing ultimate portability (discounting the added weight of a charger) and reasonably rapid recycling (appox. 4 seconds) at the expense of endurance -- maximum of 80 flashes. It may be recharged by the SA-1 in 14-16 hours or the SH-1 in approximately 3 hours. NC stands for "Nickel-Cadmium", the type that thrives on deep discharge and other such abuses.

Although the SN-1 is tapered to fit correctly into the handle of the SB-1, it may be useful to know that the positive terminal faces upwards (i.e. towards the head). It is loaded as you would load a typical hand-held electric torch: unscrew the bottom cap, put in the SN-1, and close it back up.

SN-2 NiCad

The SN-2 is a composite-cell NiCad cluster (similar to the Metz 45-series NiCd) that fits into the SB-5's handle and provides excellent portability and fairly decent performance. Just like the SN-1, it poops out fairly quickly -- after just 75 full-power flashes, although the SB-5 has multiple lower-power modes, including three automatic settings, which help extend its life. Recycling times range between 0.25 and 2.6 seconds, depending on the mode in use.

SN-3 NiCad

These you load into the SD-5 to provide a portable power source for the SB-6.

SH-1 NC Battery Charger

The SH-1 is a rapid charger for the SN-1. It plugs into mains current and recharges the SN-1 in approximately 3 hours (plug the SN-1 into a socket on the body).

SH-2 NC Battery Charger

Just as you'd expect, the SH-2 recharges the SN-2 fairly rapidly. It plugs into mains current.

SH-3 NC Battery Charger

Although this is the rapid charger for the SN-3 NC Battery, I do not know how many batteries it will take or how quickly it can charge them.

MS-2 Battery Clip

According to B. "Moose" Peterson, this is the battery clip for the SB-7E/8E. I have some doubts about this, as this is the same designation for the the MB-2's battery clips, although it is possible, as the MB-2 uses eight batteries in two clips.

Nikon Flash Units: BC-Series| Original Nikon Speedlight
SB-2 | SB-3 | SB-4 | SB-5 | SB-6 | SB-7E | SB-8E | SB-9 | SB-E | SB-10
SB-11
| SB-12 | SB-14 | SB-140 UV-IR| SB-15 | SB16A | SB-17 | SB-18, SB-19 | SR2/SM-2 Ringlights | SB-21A (SB-29) Macro flash | Flash Accesories | SF-1 Pilot Lamp

Nikon AF-TTL Speedlights | SB-20 | SB-22 | SB-23 | SB-24 | SB-25 | SB-26 | SB-27 | SB-28 | Nikon SB-29(s) | Nikon SB-30 | Nikon SB-600 | Nikon SB-800 (updated)
Nikon AF-TTL Speedlight DX-Series:
Nikon SB-28DX | SB-50DX | SB-80DX (updated)

| Back | to Index page for Nikon Flash for F & F2.



   
| Back to Nikon F2 - Main Index Page (NEW)

* Message Board for Nikon F2 Series Bodies

Main Reference map in HTML & PDF:
Body with FTN Finder | FTN finder | camera body |
External links for F & F2

logo.gif (3k)
| Message Board | for Nikon F Series SLR Camera(s)
| Message Board | for your Nikon Optics in a shared environment
| Message Board | Specifically tor Dispose or Looking for Nikon Photographic equipment

weblibrary.gif   Nikon F | Nikon F2 | Nikon F3 | Nikon F4 | Nikon F5 | Nikon F6 -not ready | Nikkormat / Nikomat | Nikon FM | Nikon FE/ FA | Nikon EM/FG/FG20 | Nikon Digital SLRs | Nikon - Other models

Nikon Auto Focus Nikkor lenses:- Main Index Page
Nikon
Manual Focus Nikkor lenses:- Fisheye-Nikkor Lenses - Circular | Full Frame | Ultrawides Lenses - 13mm15mm18mm20mm | Wideangle Lenses - 24mm28mm35mm | Standard Lenses - 45mm 50mm 58mm | Telephoto Lenses - 85mm105mm135mm180mm & 200mm | Super-Telephoto Lenses - 300mm 400mm 500mm 600mm 800mm 1200mm |

Nikkor Link.jpg

Index Page
  Special Application lenses:
Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
Reflex-Nikkor Lenses - 500mm 1000mm 2000mm
Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

Tele-Converters: TC-1 | TC-2 | TC-200 | TC-201 | TC-300 | TC-301 | TC-14 | TC-14A | TC-14B | TC-14C | TC-14E | TC-16 | TC-16A | TC-20E

Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

name.gifHOME
Copyright © 1998. Michael C. Liu ®

Site rearranged by: leofoo ®. Credit: Hiura Shinsaku® from Nikomat Club of Japan for feeding some useful inputs on the introductory page. The great 3D logo by Kiasu; Ted Wengelaar®, Holland for his continuous flow of input of early Nikon bodies. Stephen Gandy's Cameraquest; Marc Vorgers from Holland for his additinal images on Nikon F Apollo; Hayao Tanabe corrected my Red Dot and Early F assertions. Gray Levett, Grays of Westminster publishes an excellent monthly historical look at Nikon products, from where I learned about the high-speed F's. Made with a PowerMac, broadcast with a Redhat Linux powered server.

MIR Logo.gif
Home - Photography in Malaysia
Search.gif