Modern Classic SLRs Series :
Nikon FM2(n) - Other Issues Part 1

 
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Background:

In 1977, Nikon introduced a new way of automated maximum aperture indexing (AI) which sets the lens' maximum aperture automatically. Prior to this innovative mechanical coupling, you would need a prong (lens) and pin (camera) arrangement, the AI feature has a spring lever inside the lens mount which will react with a ridge (Meter coupling Ridge) on the back of the lens, so when an AI-spec lens is coupled with an AI capable camera body, it will set the lens for maximum brightness for the convenience in focusing and composing. It also allows the lens to meter with more convenience and accuracy *.

aperturelver.jpg
* In theory, stopped down metering (activate by pressing Depth of Field Preview lever or Button on the camera) should be a more accurate form of metering as you are using the working aperture (Opening diaphragm of the lens) to meter a scene. AI method of metering is more like a 'simulation' (Frankly, "AI", true to its nature of how it works - can also be interpret as "Artificial Indexing".. as the user selected aperture value is only taken into calculation of exposure measurement where the metering circuit gives a 'projected' value based on maximum aperture of the lens).

WARNING: IF you have an AI lens, you should NOT attempt to use Stopped Down Metering method as EXPOSURE ERROR will occurred because, the metering circuit of the camera is based on an open aperture method as a basis for exposure calculation.

Nikon had 5 SLR camera models, namely Nikon F2A, F2AS, Nikkormat FT3 and Nikon EL2 revised from older models (Nikon F2S, F2SB, Nikkormat FT-2 and EL) to take advantage of the new AI feature. The other one being the Nikon FM. The Nikon FM, was a new camera model designed from ground up, it is a compact mechanical SLR camera aimed to replace the Nikkormat FT series. The FM retains many good features of the FT series with a host of very well thought out and functional features on its own. It was very well made, rugged, compact and remarkably easy to use and Nikon also designed a moderately high speed Motor Drive MD-11 which capable of performing 3.5 fps automatic film advance. The camera also shares many other Nikon system accessories for remote and macro etc. which opens up many other photographic possibilities. Overall, the FM was a success commercially. It has helped Nikon established a fine reputation as being a notable camera manufacturer which always produced high quality and extremely reliable camera bodies. The Nikon FM, along with the automatic counterpart, the Nikon FE formed the basis for Nikon's midrange and mid-price alternatives supplementing and filling the gap behind pro-calibre Nikon F2 which enjoyed such a commanding position in the professional camera market during seventies and the Nikon F3 models which was introduced later in 1980.

The original FM has a mode selector (like the Nikon F2's shutter release lock) around the shutter release button. Later upgrades has remove this feature when newer MD12 is made available (color-coded: black index for regular operation, red for motor drive) for added convenience. For the first version, two triggering modes are available in the mode selector: regular via the camera body's shutter release button and film advance lever, and motor drive via the triggering button of the MD-11/MD12 Motor Drive Unit. *Note that in the motor drive position, the selector effectively locks regular shutter release operation.

Yes. The Nikon FM/FE remained as the core model(s) supporting the professional model Nikon F3 despite there was an ultra-compact model, Nikon EM introduced a year earlier in 1979 which followed surprisingly with a first programmed AE SLR, Nikon FG in 1981. The original FM introduced back in 1977 has gone through only a known minor improvement over its product cycle.

The affordable all time classic Nikon FM2

The first quarter of the '80 was rather eventful in the photographic market. The year 1982, if I can still recalled, Canon introduced their second professional camera model, Canon New F-1 along with upgrade of AE-1, a three modes AE-1 Program; Contax, after shifting many of their facilities to Japan, also introduced their 2nd revised professional model, a TTL capable Contax RTS II; there were a few 'experimental' autofocus SLRs unveiled by Pentax (Even Nikon joined in that market a year later in 1983 with their first autofocus SLR, the Nikon F3AF) and a few others. But the strongest 'threat' posted to Nikon's supremacy was the rumor that Olympus will reveal their second mechanical body after the immensely successful original Olympus OM-1(n) . The Olympus OM-1at that time, was almost 10 years old in 1982.

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In a rather surprise move, Nikon unveiled their secret weapon in the Nikon FM2. As the name implied, it was supposedly to be an upgrade of the trustworthy predecessor with a few technological breakthrough on its own. Most noticeable improvement is centered around the shutter mechanism, while a few adopted features were actually being introduced in the electronic Nikon FE in 1978.

As automation and electronics gradually emerged as the prime topic in R&D for camera manufacturers during the early part of the '80, mechanical cameras remained as a rare offering from their line of product. Are you doubtful of what I said ? Lookat Canon, other than their Canon New F-1, none of their other models remain operative without a power source installed inside in any of the bodies. Minoltas did not fair better than the Canon in this respect, and Pentax had only their flagship model, Pentax LX and the evergreen entry model, K-1000 as the two remaining models which were still mechanical based. Like any other fully mechanical cameras, main selling points are centered around highlighting the excellence of mechanical engineering and these bodies offer a high degree of creative control which "preferred by professionals and serious photographers". The shutter speed ring should mirror the essence of the FM2 in the most direct form. In terms of construction, innovation and design, the FM2 bears little resemblance to its competition. As a matter of record, it was the world first commercial production SLR camera that broke the speed barrier of 1/4000 sec and 1/200 sec sync speed for flash photography.

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The shutter speed ring, as illustrated at left, can be easily distinguishable from the current model, FM2n (or New FM2 in Japan). The maximum sync speed scale of 'X200' was given at the end of the scale after the 1/4000sec. At 1/200 second, the flash sync speed was world's fastest among any 35mm focal plane shutter cameras (And still remains among one of the fastest mechanical bodies until today).

It also features the world's first vertically-traveled titanium shutter curtain which has a unique look of a beehive. The "Nikon designed" shutter (Obviously, Nikon never produced the shutter, Copal did) enables a high shutter speeds of up to 1/4000 second. - which effectively double that of the nearest competitions during that era.

Model

Speed

Sync

ASA

MExp

MD/Winder

(EV)

MLup

Screen

Backs

Finder

Prism

Lenses

Shutter/Backup

Nikon F

1-1000, B, T

1/60

Prism *

#**

4 fps

Prism *

yes

14 ***

250, L.format

100%

4

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

Nikon F2

10-2000, B, T

1/80

Prism *

#**

5 fps

Prism **

yes

14 ***

250, 750 #***

100%

4

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

Nikon F3

8-2000, B, T

1/80

12-6400

 

6 fps##

1-18

yes

23 types

MF14, 18, 6B,250

100%

6

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/60

FT , FTN, FT-2) #

1-1000, B

1/125

6-1600

#**

No

3-17

yes

Fixed

fixed

92%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

Nikkormat FT3

1-1000, B

1/125

12-1600

#**

No

3-17

yes

Fixed

fixed

92%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

EL ; ELW

4-1000, B

1/125

25-1600

#**

No, 2 fps

1-18

yes

Fixed

fixed

92%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/90

Nikkormat EL2

8-1000, B

1/125

12-3200

#**

2 fps

1-18

yes

Fixed

fixed

92%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/90

FM

1-1000, B

1/125

12-3200

 

3.5 fps

1-18

No

Fixed

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

FE

8-1000, B

1/90

12-4000

 

3.5 fps

1-18

No

3

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/90

FM2

1-4000, B

1/200

12-6400

 

3.2 fps

1-18

No

3

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

FM2n

1-4000, B

1/250

12-6400

 

3.2 fps

1-18

No

3

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Mechanical

FE2

8-4000, B

1/250

12-4000

 

3.2 fps

1-18

No

3

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/250

FA

8-4000, B

1/250

12-4000

 

****

1-20#*

No

3

MF-12, MF-16

93%

Fixed

 

 

 

 

 

Electronic, 1/250

* Meter built-in Prism, determined by individual metered prism: 6-4000 (Model III Meter), 10-1600 (Photomic, T, and Tn), 6-6400 (Photomic FTn). F2 DP1 meterless; F2 Photomic 6-6400; F2S, F2SB, F2A, F2AS: 12-6400. *** Possible to interchange between F/F2 #: Nikkormat FS is meterless and do not has Mirror Lock up feature. ** F2S, F2A: EV1-17; F2SB, F2AS: EV -1-17; #* EV1-16 in Multi Segment (Matrix) metering; EV1-20 in Center weighted metering. #**: dedicated multiple exposure lever is provided srated from Nikon FM; previous models would require via rewind button disengagement of film transport, Nikon F and Nikkormat is very tedious to use.. #*** MF-1 250 exposure MF-2 750 exposure MF-3 Stop MF-10/11 Data/Data 250 MZ-1 250 cassette MZ-2 750 cassette Oxberry pin-register Forscher Polaroid Speed Magny. **** 2.8 fps when with MD-11/MD12; 3.3 fps when used with dedicated MD-15. ##: 6 fps is possible with mirror flipping at up position using Nicd battery MN-2.

Non-AI

AI Modified

AI, AI-S

Series E

AF Nikkor

 

NOT possible

 

Usable

Depends on Model

If you use the chart above to compare, you will probably understand why the Nikon FM2 has been remained so popular in demand for such a long span of time. First is being (and perhaps the most important reason on its continual survival) it remains as the SOLE mechanical SLR camera model Nikon still keeps on its production line and one of the few handful models that is available on the market.

NikonF4s.jpg
The decision to go ALL electronic with the Nikon F4 in 1988 means you do need a mechanical camera to support their all electronic SLRs lineup and making the Nikon system more attractive and complete than its competitions. Secondly, it also makes a lot of business sense to lure in more first time users at school and colleage level to commit them with the Nikon photographic system just by providing them a good, solid entry model.<<--- Nikon F4 of 1988 was the first Nikon professional F series model that entirely depends on battery to operate. The mechanincal FM2(n) has more reasons to be around to supplement all these electronic Nikons and it remains as the sole Nikon model that is mechanical.

The 1/4000sec shutter speed and 1/200sec sync speed was considered a breakthrough and big event in the photographic community when it was announced. It has bridged the gap in its maximum sync speed close to those of leaf shutter of 1/500 sec of medium format cameras. Along with other features incorporated and refinement made in the new body, it was overall a worthy upgrade. While main attraction for FM2 was centered on the new Nikon designed vertically traveling honeycombed titanium shutter (As said earlier, they didn't produced the shutter, a contract manufacturer, Copal Co. Ltd. did, probably that was the reason why they always quoted "Nikon designed shutter .."), but its earlier development did encountered with some technological problems. I would believe Nikon did put a lot of research effort enabled realization of the high speed shutter. First hurdle was to reduce the traveling mass of the shutter curtains. At the early stage of development, aluminum alloy (as used in the current FM2n) was the primary material of choice for the shutter.It was scrapped at its early development stage, because shutter designed using this material exhibited instability in its overall performance. Thus, Nikon has revert to Titanium metal which they were more familiar with due to the experience they had with earlier Nikon F and F2 bodies. (But then, aliminium shutter is cheaper to produce and easier to shape in the manufacturing processes, and thus, further research was still on despite earlier laid off of the project and resulting in successfully realizing earlier vision by Copal).

NikonEM.jpg
If you were to observe the development of Nikon SLR cameras, virtually all of Nikon's mid-compact bodies of the '80 have a faster sync speed of beyond 1/90 sec., because instead of using a horizontal traveled shutter curtain design which has a longer traveling distance of 36mm to travel in a 35mm picture format as compared with vertically at 24mm.

<<-- First of the series of three super compact Nikon bodies, EM (FG and FG-20) were offering 1/90 sec sync., which is similar to the Nikon FE. The Nikon FE-10, introduced almost 20 years after the EM pictured here, also featuring a moderately slow sync speed of 1/90sec.

To enable realization of such high shutter speed in a mechanical shutter, the choice of material for its shutter curtain blades has to endure maximum of stress. Titanium's specific gravity is about one third lower than other metal alloys, and it seemed more than just an ideal choice, because in that time,no other camera manufacturer has more experience handling this rare earth metal than Nikon.

el2shutter.gif f2shutter.gif
Note: Nikon FM2's shutter boosts a curtain traveled speed of only 3.3 milliseconds which enables the top shutter speed of 1/4000sec and 1/250sec sync speed. Compared it with EL2's vertical traveled curtain of 7Ms and Nikon F2's horizontal traveled curtain speed of 10 Ms. Nikon FM2n's later shutter unit was using aluminum alloy.

Decision to adopt Titanium as the material for its shutter curtain design is one thing, perfecting it for such specific application was another. In order to achieve such demanding specification in terms of high repeatition of usage, the shutter blades were etched in a modified honeycomb pattern, that looked like a beehive. The etching reduces their thickness, thus reducing their weight by nearly 60% than conventional shutter using alloy. The honeycomb structure also increases the rigidity of the curtains, so no warping results that could allow light to leak in. Further, to enhance strength, the curtains are treated through a special nitrite process.

Shutter Blades in the state of cocking and release positions of the Titanium Shutter used on earlier version of FM2(n) bodies. <--- Before an exposure
After an exposure
--->

To minimize friction, the shutter bearing is made with a special oilless metal to ensure more uniform movement and increased its stability even at very low temperatures. Even the shutter curtain brakes have been enlarged to maintain bounce-free stops at all shutter speeds. Such development ensured overall result of its performance is not only a shutter that's twice as fast as others offered by rivaling competitions, but with aim to achieve a more stable performance throughout all its shutter speed range.

FM2t80mm.jpg (18k) Loading...
May be it needed some comparison to really appreciate Nikon's dedication devoted to such research and a leading role it played in the course of SLR development. Canon, despite enjoyed such tremendous commercial success with an all electronic SLR approach, it was quite surprising to find their midrange A -series camera models were using mainly fabric for their shutter curtain design* - even their mighty six AE modes Canon A-1 was not spared !

Another example is Olympus. Beginning from Olympus OM-1 back in 1972, and followed with some other fine models such as OM-2, OM-2SP, OM-3 and OM4, fabric shutter curtains were used. * It took Canon's first T-series SLR models, Canon T-50 (March, 1983) to incorporate with a shutter that was using metal alloy. However, their flagship Canon New F-1 was offering a Titanium shutter and remained as the sole model within Canon that may not require a battery to function (Hybrid mechanical shutter) during the '80.

Subsequent Nikon models, a revised FE2 and a multimode Nikon FA (which reputedly incorporating the world' first multi-segments metering) that followed a year later in 1983, had helped Nikon, which generally being portrayed by most industrial observers as an rather conservative company to established a comfortable foothold and respectable position in the mid-price SLR market. Where Canon, Pentax and even Minolta had most of their users' attention with exciting SLR bodies such as Canon's evergreen A-1, Pentax's Super A etc., Minolta's three modes X-700 were causing some sensation among entry users and serious amateurs market.

curtain.jpg
The multi-AE modes Nikon FA and FE-2's revised shutter enabled a new 1/250 sec speed boost with its sync speed and retaining the 1/4000 sec. enabled Nikon enjoyed an leading edge over competitions in product technology for few years.

The FM2, obviously benefiting from the electronic bodies of FE2 and FA's successes in refining the newly introduced Titanium shutter, eventually had its 1/200sec sync speed raised at par with its electronic counterpart to 1/250sec. That upgraded model was termed as FM2n or referred as New FM2 in Japanese market. The Nikon AF F801 of 1988 was the first model among the many Nikon SLRs that offered a fast 1/8800 sec shutter speed. The early scrapped project of using aluminum alloy for the FM2's shutter 10 years ago by Copal was eventually realized.

shutterblades.jpg
Other than speed boost, it is more reliable than ever and even the professional Nikon F4 was using similar material as basis for its shutter design which claimed durable and reliable enough to withstand a minimum of 150,000 exposure cycles.

The FM2n, had its Titanium shutter replaced with an Aluminum alloy type barely a year later in 1989/90 after the F801/F4, the new shutter design is still being used until now, that is almost slightly over 10 years after the shift took place. All FM2n (except the original FM2 with 1/200 sync speed) bodies will be replaced with the current type of shutter should your shutter unit is damaged and in a state of beyond repair.

meteronofffinder.jpg
Among other improved user's interface was its operational control. I remembered my first attempt to use the Meter-Switch-On shutter release button was quite an experience.

Technical: The Shutter Button has a release power of 250-400g; whole stroke is 2.5+-0.3mm with release stroke 0.4mm or less from the surface of button guide. While the Meter Switch on stroke is 0.3mm or more from the surface of button guide.

Although the film advance lever is still acted as an Shutter Release Button Lock but meter-on switch has been designed to make use of the shutter release button where a energy saving feature was also incorporated in the circuitry.

sutbtn.jpg
Although it was not a first within the industry (I think Canon AE-1 of 1976 was the first SLR model to incorporate that feature and Nikon EM in 1979 was the first Nikon to offer that among all Nikons).

Well, this reminds me about the input dials method first used on Nikon F5 (Well, another "borrowed" technology from the Canon T90 of 1986), it takes a little while to get used to such way of adjusting aperture values and shutter speeds if you have owned a Nikon camera prior to its arrival. In operation, IF you have no experience with a Nikon SLR after 1979, this may take a few practices to perfect the skill. By just partially depressing the slightly enlarged shutter release button simultaneously activates the LED exposure display and the built-in light meter. The circuit will enables the exposure meter stays on for a full 30 seconds, then automatically switches off to conserve battery power. It can be reactivated by a light touch of the shutter release button again. To take the shot, just depress further down and it will trigger the shutter. Another notable refinement was at its film sensitivity range. The Nikon FM2's film speed settings was "pumped" up to 6400 from a low 12 ASA/ISO for greater flexibility in low light - effectively made Nikon FM2 one of the few SLRs on the market that has the widest range working range with various film types and sensitivity. Just for an instance, when working in low light photography, the extra sensitivity means you can push your film further than ever before - without the hassle of recalculating light meter readings.

ASA Bar.gif

The extended settings also permit use of a wider variety of films. Originally Nikon thought that the extended film speed setting will not only handle those films that were available during early part of the '80, but also cater for the faster film speed anticipated in the years to come.

fm2n50f2.jpg

Kodak.jpg

What these two familar items have in common ? Year 2000: The ASA200 film has claimed to achieve 50% improvement with grain structure at par with older fine grain film of ASA 100 of yester-year but no one dare to claim the ASA100 has improved to a state matching excellent grains of ASA50 film ! The camera, on the other hand, takes modern AF lenses. But prices have spiiked from RM3.20 per box to RM12.50 for the film while the camera is retailing at RM1,650.00 from RM350.00 15 years ago...RM3.80 = US1.00 Year 2000; RM2.50 = US1.00, 1982 That means: after paying 4 times premium, we got 50% improvement over the film; while the camera is even worst, that is 4 X premium paid only for changing shutter design with an aluminum alloy.


Well, Konica introduced their ultra fast speed ASA 3200 color film back in the early '80, Kodak also brought their pushable negative film to the market place, naturally, one would expect 15-20 years later, shutter speed would break 1/15,000, sync speed at 1/500 sec and low priced fine-grain film with speed of 3200 to 6400 should not be unpopular ! But now at year 2000, 18 years after the birth of the FM2, you will realized that none of these manufacturers had put any serious effort in their product development to benefit consumers like us...

| Previous | Next | Other Issues Part II (1/5 parts)

| Back | Index Page of Nikon FM2 models
| Back | Index Page of Nikon FM2(n) models
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Full Specifications: Main Reference Map : HTML | PDF
Nikon FM2n's Instruction Manual is ONLY available in HTML format (6 parts)

Standard production Nikon FM Series models:- Nikon FM | Nikon FM2 | Nikon FM2n | Nikon FM10 | Nikon FM3a |
Known variants:- Nikon FM Gold | Nikon FM2/T | Nikon FM2N Tropical Set | Nikon FM2/T Limited Edition | Nikon FM2N LAPITA | Nion FM2n Millennium 2000

| Message Board | for your favourite Nikon FM Series SLR models
| Message Board | for your Nikon Optics in a shared environment
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Shared Resources: MD-11 | MD-12 | Focusing Screens | Titanium Shutter | Flash Units -SB-16 | SB-15 | SB-10 or other Options | Databack | Nikkor lens mount (related info)

Others:- Nikon AF-TTL Speedlights | SB-20 (1986) | SB-22 (1987) | SB-23 | SB-24 (1988) | SB-25 (1991/2) | SB-26 (1994) | SB-27(1997) | SB-28 (1997) | Nikon SB-29(s) (2000) | Nikon SB-30 (2003) | Nikon SB-600 (2004) | Nikon SB-800 (2003) Nikon AF-TTL Speedlight DX-Series: Nikon SB-28DX (1999) | SB-50DX (2001) | SB-80DX (2002)

Nikon BC-flash Series | Original Nikon Speedlight
SB-2 | SB-3 | SB-4 | SB-5 | SB-6 | SB-7E | SB-8E | SB-9 | SB-E | SB-10
SB-11
| SB-12 | SB-14 | SB-140 UV-IR| SB-15 | SB16A | SB-17 | SB-18, SB-19 | SB-21A (SB-29) Macro flash | Flash Accesories | SF-1 Pilot Lamp

Instruction Manual: Nikon FM (HTML | PDF) | Nikon FM-10 (HTML) | Nikon FM2n's User's Manual available only in HTML format (6 parts) | Nikon FM3A (HTML)
Specifications:
Nikon FM, FM-10, FM2, FM2n and FM3A / Main Reference Map: (HTML) Nikon FM, FM2, FM-10, FM2n (Applicable to FM2T, FM2 "Year of the Dog"; Millennium 2000") and Nikon FM3A


Nikon Auto Focus Nikkor lenses:- Main Index Page (under constant construction)
weblibrary.gif   Nikon F | Nikon F2 | Nikon F3 | Nikon F4 | Nikon F5 | Nikon F6 | Nikkormat / Nikomat | Nikon FM | Nikon FE/ FA | Nikon EM/FG/FG20 | Nikon Digital SLRs | Nikon - Other models

Nikon Auto Focus Nikkor lenses:- Main Index Page
Nikon Manual Focus Nikkor lenses:- Fisheye-Nikkor Lenses - Circular | Full Frame | Ultrawides Lenses - 13mm15mm18mm20mm | Wideangle Lenses - 24mm28mm35mm | Standard Lenses - 45mm 50mm 58mm | Telephoto Lenses - 85mm105mm135mm180mm & 200mm | Super-Telephoto Lenses - 300mm 400mm 500mm 600mm 800mm 1200mm |

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Index Page
  Special Application lenses:
Micro-Nikkor Lenses - 50mm~55mm -60mm 85mm -105mm 200mm Micro-Zoom 70-180mm
Perspective Control (PC) - 28mm 35mm PC-Micro 85mm
Dedicated Lenses for Nikon F3AF: AF 80mm f/2.8 | AF 200mm f/3.5 EDIF
Depth of Field Control (DC): 105mm 135mm
Medical Nikkor: 120mm 200mm
Reflex-Nikkor Lenses - 500mm 1000mm 2000mm
Others: Noct Nikkor | OP-Nikkor | UV Nikkor 55mm 105mm | Focusing Units | Bellows-Nikkor 105mm 135mm
Nikon Series E Lenses: 28mm35mm50mm100mm135mm | E-Series Zoom lenses: 36~72mm75~150mm70~210mm


MF Zoom-Nikkor Lenses: 25~50mm | 28~45mm | 28~50mm | 28~85mm | 35~70mm | 36~72mm E | 35~85mm | 35~105mm | 35~135mm | 35~200mm | 43~86mm | 50~135mm | 50~300mm | 70~210mm E | 75~150mm E | 80~200mm | 85~250mm | 100~300mm | 180~600mm | 200~400mm | 200~600mm | 360~1200mm | 1200~1700mm

Tele-Converters: TC-1 | TC-2 | TC-200 | TC-201 | TC-300 | TC-301 | TC-14 | TC-14A | TC-14B | TC-14C | TC-14E | TC-16 | TC-16A | TC-20E

Recommended links to understand more technical details related to the Nikkor F-mount and production Serial Number:
http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-153.html by: my friend, Rick Oleson
http://www.zi.ku.dk/personal/lhhansen/photo/fmount.htm by: Hansen, Lars Holst
http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/nikonfmount/lens2.htm
http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html

W A R N I N G: The New G-SERIES Nikkor lenses have no aperture ring on the lens, they CANNOT ADJUST APERTURES with any of these manual focus Nikon FE series SLR camera models; please ignore some portion of the content contained herein this site where it relates.

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Credit: To all the good people who has contributed their own experience, resources or those who are kind enough granting us permission to use their images appeared in this site. Mr. MCLau®, who has helped to rewrite some of the content appeared this site. Chuck Hester® who has been helping me all along with the development of all these Nikon websites;LarsHolst Hansen, 'Hawkeye' who shares the same passion I have; Ms Rissa, Sales manager from Nikon Corporation Malaysia for granting permission to use some of the official content; TedWengelaar,Holland who has helped to provide many useful input relating to older Nikkor lenses; Some of the references on production serial numbers used in this site were extracted from Roland Vink's website; HiuraShinsaku from Nikomat Club Japan. t is also a site to remember a long lost friend on the Net. Note:certain content and images appeared in this site were either scanned from official marketing leaflets, brochures, sales manuals or publications published by Nikon over the years and/or contribution from surfers who claimed originality of their work for educational purposes. The creator of the site will not be responsible for may discrepancies arise from such dispute except rectifying them after verification."Nikon", "Nikkormat", "Nippon Kokagu KK" & "Nikkor" are registered tradename of Nikon Corporation Inc., Japan. Site made with an Apple IMac.